Conserved regions in mammalian β-globins: Could they arise by cross-species gene exchange?

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7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Comparison of the nucleotide sequences from the coding regions of the four mammalian β-globin genes shows that different parts of these genes have evolved at two different rates. Those codons designating amino acids 1-20, 41-91 and 109-146 have accumulated substitutions in a random fashion as the molecular clock hypothesis would predict. The codons at positions 21-40 and 91 to 108 behave as if they evolved at a much slower rate. Each of the slowly evolved regions contains an intron. Conservation of the coding sequences flanking the introns are hypothesized to be the result of cross-species gene exchange.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)685-696
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Theoretical Biology
Volume107
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 21 1984
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Medicine(all)

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