Conservative versus aggressive follow up of mildly abnormal Pap smears

Testing for process utility

Stephen Birch, Joy Melnikow, Miriam Kuppermann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Economic evaluation generally limits outcome measurement to the valuation of health outcomes produced by interventions without considering the impact of processes on utility. We test for process utility by comparing utility measurements for alternative approaches to managing abnormal Pap smears in the context of a fixed outcome. The impact of health care interventions on individual well-being was not confined to health outcomes. Aggressive and conservative follow-up approaches were associated with statistically significant differences in utilities. We also found that relative preferences among different processes may depend on the particular circumstances or pathologies being considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)879-884
Number of pages6
JournalHealth Economics
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003

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Papanicolaou Test
Health
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Pathology
Delivery of Health Care
health
pathology
well-being
health care
Testing
evaluation
economics
Health outcomes

Keywords

  • Outcomes research
  • Prevention
  • Primary care
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Conservative versus aggressive follow up of mildly abnormal Pap smears : Testing for process utility. / Birch, Stephen; Melnikow, Joy; Kuppermann, Miriam.

In: Health Economics, Vol. 12, No. 10, 01.10.2003, p. 879-884.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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