Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture, November 3-5 1997: Report

D. J. Ramsey, M. A. Bowman, P. E. Greenman, S. P. Jiang, L. H. Kushi, S. Leeman, K. M. Lin, D. E. Moerman, S. H. Schnoll, M. Walker, C. Waternaux, L. A. Wisneski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To provide health care providers, patients, and the general public with a responsible assessment of the use and effectiveness of acupuncture for a variety of conditions. Participants. A non-Federal, nonadvocate, 12-member panel representing the fields of acupuncture, pain, psychology, psychiatry, physical medicine and rehabilitation, drug abuse, family practice, internal medicine, health policy, epidemiology, statistics, physiology, biophysics, and the public. In addition, 25 experts from these same fields presented data to the panel and a conference audience of 1200. Evidence. The literature was searched through Medline and an extensive bibliography of references was provided to the panel and the conference audience. Experts prepared abstracts with relevant citations from the literature. Scientific evidence was given precedence over clinical anecdotal experience. Consensus Process. The panel, answering predefined questions, developed their conclusions based on the scientific evidence presented in open forum and the scientific literature. The panel composed a draft statement that was read in its entirety and circulated to the experts and the audience for comment. Thereafter, the panel resolved conflicting recommendations and released a revised statement at the end of the conference. The panel finalized the revisions within a few weeks after the conference. The draft statement was made available on the World Wide Web immediately following its release at the conference and was updated with the panel's final revisions. Conclusions. Acupuncture as a therapeutic intervention is widely practiced in the United States. While there have been many studies of its potential usefulness, many of these studies provide equivocal results because of design, sample size, and other factors. The issue is further complicated by inherent difficulties in the use of appropriate controls, such as placebos and sham acupuncture groups. However, promising results have emerged, for example, showing efficacy of acupuncture in adult post-operative and chemotherapy nausea and vomiting and in post-operative dental pain. There are other situations such as addiction, stroke rehabilitation, headache, menstrual cramps, tennis elbow, fibromyalgia, myofacial pain, osteoarthritis, low back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and asthma where acupuncture may be useful as an adjunct treatment or an acceptable alternative or be included in a comprehensive management program. Further research is likely to uncover additional areas where acupuncture interventions will be useful.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-90
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Pharmaceutical Care in Pain and Symptom Control
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Consensus Development Conferences
Acupuncture
Tennis Elbow
Literature
Biophysics
Muscle Cramp
Pain
Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Facial Pain
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Fibromyalgia
Family Practice
Bibliography
Internal Medicine
Health Policy
Low Back Pain
Osteoarthritis
Health Personnel
Internet
Sample Size

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Ramsey, D. J., Bowman, M. A., Greenman, P. E., Jiang, S. P., Kushi, L. H., Leeman, S., ... Wisneski, L. A. (1998). Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture, November 3-5 1997: Report. Journal of Pharmaceutical Care in Pain and Symptom Control, 6(4), 67-90. https://doi.org/10.1300/J088v06n04_05

Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture, November 3-5 1997 : Report. / Ramsey, D. J.; Bowman, M. A.; Greenman, P. E.; Jiang, S. P.; Kushi, L. H.; Leeman, S.; Lin, K. M.; Moerman, D. E.; Schnoll, S. H.; Walker, M.; Waternaux, C.; Wisneski, L. A.

In: Journal of Pharmaceutical Care in Pain and Symptom Control, Vol. 6, No. 4, 1998, p. 67-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ramsey, DJ, Bowman, MA, Greenman, PE, Jiang, SP, Kushi, LH, Leeman, S, Lin, KM, Moerman, DE, Schnoll, SH, Walker, M, Waternaux, C & Wisneski, LA 1998, 'Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture, November 3-5 1997: Report', Journal of Pharmaceutical Care in Pain and Symptom Control, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 67-90. https://doi.org/10.1300/J088v06n04_05
Ramsey, D. J. ; Bowman, M. A. ; Greenman, P. E. ; Jiang, S. P. ; Kushi, L. H. ; Leeman, S. ; Lin, K. M. ; Moerman, D. E. ; Schnoll, S. H. ; Walker, M. ; Waternaux, C. ; Wisneski, L. A. / Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture, November 3-5 1997 : Report. In: Journal of Pharmaceutical Care in Pain and Symptom Control. 1998 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 67-90.
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AU - Lin, K. M.

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