Conjunctival transplantation. Autologous and homologous grafts

R. A. Weise, Mark J Mannis, D. W. Vastine, L. S. Fujikawa, A. M. Roth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autologous conjunctival transplants have been used successfully for restoration of damaged ocular surfaces. Homologous (allogeneic) conjunctival grafts have been explored less systematically. We developed a nonhumane primate model for comparison of autologous and homologous conjunctival transplantation in order to assess the clinical viability and immunopathologic characteristics of these grafts. Autologous or homologous grafts were performed in nine adult rhesus monkeys. Both autologous and homologous grafts were compared for clinical viability and immunopathologic change. Clinical results suggest that, although homologous grafts incited a greater inflammatory and scarring response, there was minimal graft shrinkage and a normal surface epithelium. Immunopathologic studies using laminin, bullous pemphigoid antigen, and fibronectin indicate that, despite the increased inflammatory response seen in homografts, the epithelial surface is normal. With our increasing ability to modulate the immune response, conjunctival homografts may play a role in restoration of the ocular surface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1736-1740
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume103
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1985

Fingerprint

Transplantation
Transplants
Allografts
Bullous Pemphigoid
Homologous Transplantation
Autografts
Laminin
Macaca mulatta
Fibronectins
Primates
Cicatrix
Epithelium
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Weise, R. A., Mannis, M. J., Vastine, D. W., Fujikawa, L. S., & Roth, A. M. (1985). Conjunctival transplantation. Autologous and homologous grafts. Archives of Ophthalmology, 103(11), 1736-1740.

Conjunctival transplantation. Autologous and homologous grafts. / Weise, R. A.; Mannis, Mark J; Vastine, D. W.; Fujikawa, L. S.; Roth, A. M.

In: Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol. 103, No. 11, 1985, p. 1736-1740.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weise, RA, Mannis, MJ, Vastine, DW, Fujikawa, LS & Roth, AM 1985, 'Conjunctival transplantation. Autologous and homologous grafts', Archives of Ophthalmology, vol. 103, no. 11, pp. 1736-1740.
Weise RA, Mannis MJ, Vastine DW, Fujikawa LS, Roth AM. Conjunctival transplantation. Autologous and homologous grafts. Archives of Ophthalmology. 1985;103(11):1736-1740.
Weise, R. A. ; Mannis, Mark J ; Vastine, D. W. ; Fujikawa, L. S. ; Roth, A. M. / Conjunctival transplantation. Autologous and homologous grafts. In: Archives of Ophthalmology. 1985 ; Vol. 103, No. 11. pp. 1736-1740.
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