Congenital diaphragmatic hernia without herniation of the liver: Does the lung-to-head ratio predict survival?

L. Sbragia, B. W. Paek, R. A. Filly, M. R. Harrison, J. A. Farrell, Diana L Farmer, C. T. Albanese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to determine the ability of lung-to-head ratio to predict survival and need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in fetuses with left congenital diaphragmatic hernia without herniation of the liver into the chest. The perinatal records of 20 fetuses with isolated left congenital diaphragmatic hernia without herniation of the left lobe of the liver into the chest were reviewed. Fetuses were stratified into two groups depending on lung-to-head ratio: those with a ratio of less than 1.4 (historically a poor prognosis group) and those with a ratio of greater than 1.4. The outcome of both groups was compared with chi-square analysis. Eight of 11 fetuses with a lung-to-head ratio greater than 1.4 survived, whereas 8 of 9 fetuses with a ratio of less than 1.4 survived. No differences were noted in the need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support or survival between the two groups. Fetuses with a prenatally diagnosed left congenital diaphragmatic hernia without herniation of liver into the chest have a favorable prognosis even in the presence of a low lung-to-head ratio.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)845-848
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Ultrasound in Medicine
Volume19
Issue number12
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

fetuses
liver
lungs
Fetus
Head
Lung
chest
Liver
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Thorax
prognosis
oxygenation
membranes
lobes
Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias

Keywords

  • Congenital diaphragmatic hernia
  • Diaphragm, congenital hernia
  • Hypoplasia, lung
  • Lung-to-head ratio, fetal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Sbragia, L., Paek, B. W., Filly, R. A., Harrison, M. R., Farrell, J. A., Farmer, D. L., & Albanese, C. T. (2000). Congenital diaphragmatic hernia without herniation of the liver: Does the lung-to-head ratio predict survival? Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, 19(12), 845-848.

Congenital diaphragmatic hernia without herniation of the liver : Does the lung-to-head ratio predict survival? / Sbragia, L.; Paek, B. W.; Filly, R. A.; Harrison, M. R.; Farrell, J. A.; Farmer, Diana L; Albanese, C. T.

In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 12, 2000, p. 845-848.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sbragia, L, Paek, BW, Filly, RA, Harrison, MR, Farrell, JA, Farmer, DL & Albanese, CT 2000, 'Congenital diaphragmatic hernia without herniation of the liver: Does the lung-to-head ratio predict survival?', Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, vol. 19, no. 12, pp. 845-848.
Sbragia, L. ; Paek, B. W. ; Filly, R. A. ; Harrison, M. R. ; Farrell, J. A. ; Farmer, Diana L ; Albanese, C. T. / Congenital diaphragmatic hernia without herniation of the liver : Does the lung-to-head ratio predict survival?. In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 19, No. 12. pp. 845-848.
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