Concurrent diseases and conditions in cats with renal infarcts

M. C. Hickey, Karl Jandrey, K. S. Farrell, D. Carlson-Bremer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Renal infarcts identified without definitive association with any specific disease process. Objective: Determine diseases associated with diagnosis of renal infarcts in cats diagnosed by sonography or necropsy. Animals: 600 cats underwent abdominal ultrasonography, necropsy, or both at a veterinary medical teaching hospital. Methods: Information obtained from electronic medical records. Cats classified as having renal infarct present based on results of sonographic evaluation or necropsy. Time-matched case-controls selected from cats that underwent the next scheduled diagnostic procedure. Results: 309 of 600 cats having diagnosis of renal infarct and 291 time-matched controls. Cats 7-14 years old were 1.6 times (odds ratio, 95% CI: 1.03-2.05, P = .03) more likely to have renal infarct than younger cats but no more likely to have renal infarct than older cats (1.4, 0.89-2.25, P = .14). All P = .14 are statistically significant. Cats with renal infarcts were 4.5 times (odds ratio, 95% CI: 2.63-7.68, P < .001) more likely to have HCM compared to cats without renal infarcts. Cats with renal infarcts were 0.7 times (odds ratio, 95% CI: 0.51-0.99, P = .046) less likely to have diagnosis of neoplasia compared to cats without renal infarcts. Cats with diagnosis of hyperthyroidism did not have significant association with having renal infarct. Cats with renal infarcts were 8 times (odds ratio, 95% CI: 2.55-25.40, P ≤ .001) more likely to have diagnosis of distal aortic thromboembolism than cats without renal infarcts. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Cats with renal infarcts identified on antemortem examination should be screened for occult cardiomyopathy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-323
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

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infarction
Cats
kidneys
cats
Kidney
odds ratio
Odds Ratio
necropsy
ultrasonography
Ultrasonography
hyperthyroidism
Electronic Health Records
cardiomyopathy
Thromboembolism
Hyperthyroidism
Cardiomyopathies
Teaching Hospitals

Keywords

  • Abdominal ultrasonography
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Cardiovascular
  • Kidney
  • Radiology and diagnostic imaging
  • Thromboembolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hickey, M. C., Jandrey, K., Farrell, K. S., & Carlson-Bremer, D. (2014). Concurrent diseases and conditions in cats with renal infarcts. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 28(2), 319-323. https://doi.org/10.1111/jvim.12314

Concurrent diseases and conditions in cats with renal infarcts. / Hickey, M. C.; Jandrey, Karl; Farrell, K. S.; Carlson-Bremer, D.

In: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Vol. 28, No. 2, 03.2014, p. 319-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hickey, MC, Jandrey, K, Farrell, KS & Carlson-Bremer, D 2014, 'Concurrent diseases and conditions in cats with renal infarcts', Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 319-323. https://doi.org/10.1111/jvim.12314
Hickey, M. C. ; Jandrey, Karl ; Farrell, K. S. ; Carlson-Bremer, D. / Concurrent diseases and conditions in cats with renal infarcts. In: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 319-323.
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KW - Radiology and diagnostic imaging

KW - Thromboembolism

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