Concurrent change in dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and functional performance in the oldest old

Results from the Cardiovascular Health study all Stars study

J. L. Sanders, A. R. Cappola, A. M. Arnold, R. M. Boudreau, P. H. Chaves, John A Robbins, M. Cushman, A. B. Newman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction. The correlation between dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) decline and age led to the hypothesis that DHEAS might be a marker of primary aging, though conflicting data from observational studies of mortality do not support this. We evaluated concurrent DHEAS and functional decline in a very old cohort to test if DHEAS change tracks with functional change during aging.Methods. DHEAS and functional performance (gait speed, grip strength, Modified Mini-Mental State Examination [3MSE] score, and digit symbol substitution test [DSST] score) were measured in 1996-1997 and 2005-2006 in 989 participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study All Stars study (mean age 85.2 years in 2005-2006, 63.5% women and 16.5% African American). We used multivariable linear regression to test the association of DHEAS decline with functional decline.Results. After adjustment, each standard deviation decrease in DHEAS was associated with greater declines in gait speed (0.12 m/s, p =.01), grip strength (0.09 kg, p =.03), 3MSE score (0.13 points, p >.001), and DSST score (0.14 points, p =.001) in women only. Additional adjustment for baseline DHEAS attenuated the association with grip strength but did not alter other estimates appreciably, and baseline DHEAS was unassociated with functional decline.Conclusions. In this cohort of very old individuals, DHEAS decline tracked with declines in gait speed, 3MSE score, and DSST score, but not grip strength, in women independent of baseline DHEAS level. DHEAS decline might be a marker for age-associated performance decline, but its relevance is specific to women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)976-981
Number of pages6
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume65 A
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

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Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate
Health
Hand Strength
African Americans
Observational Studies
Linear Models

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Biomarker
  • Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate
  • Function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Concurrent change in dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and functional performance in the oldest old : Results from the Cardiovascular Health study all Stars study. / Sanders, J. L.; Cappola, A. R.; Arnold, A. M.; Boudreau, R. M.; Chaves, P. H.; Robbins, John A; Cushman, M.; Newman, A. B.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 65 A, No. 9, 09.2010, p. 976-981.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Concurrent change in dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and functional performance in the oldest old: Results from the Cardiovascular Health study all Stars study",
abstract = "Introduction. The correlation between dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) decline and age led to the hypothesis that DHEAS might be a marker of primary aging, though conflicting data from observational studies of mortality do not support this. We evaluated concurrent DHEAS and functional decline in a very old cohort to test if DHEAS change tracks with functional change during aging.Methods. DHEAS and functional performance (gait speed, grip strength, Modified Mini-Mental State Examination [3MSE] score, and digit symbol substitution test [DSST] score) were measured in 1996-1997 and 2005-2006 in 989 participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study All Stars study (mean age 85.2 years in 2005-2006, 63.5{\%} women and 16.5{\%} African American). We used multivariable linear regression to test the association of DHEAS decline with functional decline.Results. After adjustment, each standard deviation decrease in DHEAS was associated with greater declines in gait speed (0.12 m/s, p =.01), grip strength (0.09 kg, p =.03), 3MSE score (0.13 points, p >.001), and DSST score (0.14 points, p =.001) in women only. Additional adjustment for baseline DHEAS attenuated the association with grip strength but did not alter other estimates appreciably, and baseline DHEAS was unassociated with functional decline.Conclusions. In this cohort of very old individuals, DHEAS decline tracked with declines in gait speed, 3MSE score, and DSST score, but not grip strength, in women independent of baseline DHEAS level. DHEAS decline might be a marker for age-associated performance decline, but its relevance is specific to women.",
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AU - Sanders, J. L.

AU - Cappola, A. R.

AU - Arnold, A. M.

AU - Boudreau, R. M.

AU - Chaves, P. H.

AU - Robbins, John A

AU - Cushman, M.

AU - Newman, A. B.

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N2 - Introduction. The correlation between dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) decline and age led to the hypothesis that DHEAS might be a marker of primary aging, though conflicting data from observational studies of mortality do not support this. We evaluated concurrent DHEAS and functional decline in a very old cohort to test if DHEAS change tracks with functional change during aging.Methods. DHEAS and functional performance (gait speed, grip strength, Modified Mini-Mental State Examination [3MSE] score, and digit symbol substitution test [DSST] score) were measured in 1996-1997 and 2005-2006 in 989 participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study All Stars study (mean age 85.2 years in 2005-2006, 63.5% women and 16.5% African American). We used multivariable linear regression to test the association of DHEAS decline with functional decline.Results. After adjustment, each standard deviation decrease in DHEAS was associated with greater declines in gait speed (0.12 m/s, p =.01), grip strength (0.09 kg, p =.03), 3MSE score (0.13 points, p >.001), and DSST score (0.14 points, p =.001) in women only. Additional adjustment for baseline DHEAS attenuated the association with grip strength but did not alter other estimates appreciably, and baseline DHEAS was unassociated with functional decline.Conclusions. In this cohort of very old individuals, DHEAS decline tracked with declines in gait speed, 3MSE score, and DSST score, but not grip strength, in women independent of baseline DHEAS level. DHEAS decline might be a marker for age-associated performance decline, but its relevance is specific to women.

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