Computer-Assisted provision of hormonal contraception in acute care settings

Eleanor Schwarz, Elizabeth J. Burch, Sara M. Parisi, Kathleen P. Tebb, Daniel Grossman, Ateev Mehrotra, Ralph Gonzales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We evaluated whether computerized counseling about contraceptive options and screening for contraindications increased women's subsequent knowledge and use of hormonal contraception. Methods: For the study 814 women aged 18-45 years were recruited from the waiting rooms of three emergency departments and an urgent care clinic staffed by non-gynecologists and asked to use a randomly selected computer module before seeing a clinician. Results: Women in the intervention group were more likely to report receiving a contraceptive prescription when seeking acute care than women in the control group (16% vs. 1%, p=.001). Women who requested contraceptive refills were not less likely than women requesting new prescriptions to have potential contraindications to estrogen (75% of refills vs. 52% new, p=.23). Three months after visiting the clinic, women in the intervention group tended to be more likely to have used contraception at last intercourse (71% vs. 65%, p=.91) and to correctly answer questions about contraceptive effectiveness, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Patient-facing computers appear to increase access to prescription contraception for women seeking acute care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-250
Number of pages9
JournalContraception
Volume87
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Contraception
Contraceptive Agents
Prescriptions
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Hospital Emergency Service
Counseling
Estrogens
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Acute care
  • Computer information technology
  • Contraceptive counseling
  • Primary care
  • Urgent care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Schwarz, E., Burch, E. J., Parisi, S. M., Tebb, K. P., Grossman, D., Mehrotra, A., & Gonzales, R. (2013). Computer-Assisted provision of hormonal contraception in acute care settings. Contraception, 87(2), 242-250. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2012.07.003

Computer-Assisted provision of hormonal contraception in acute care settings. / Schwarz, Eleanor; Burch, Elizabeth J.; Parisi, Sara M.; Tebb, Kathleen P.; Grossman, Daniel; Mehrotra, Ateev; Gonzales, Ralph.

In: Contraception, Vol. 87, No. 2, 01.02.2013, p. 242-250.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schwarz, E, Burch, EJ, Parisi, SM, Tebb, KP, Grossman, D, Mehrotra, A & Gonzales, R 2013, 'Computer-Assisted provision of hormonal contraception in acute care settings', Contraception, vol. 87, no. 2, pp. 242-250. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2012.07.003
Schwarz, Eleanor ; Burch, Elizabeth J. ; Parisi, Sara M. ; Tebb, Kathleen P. ; Grossman, Daniel ; Mehrotra, Ateev ; Gonzales, Ralph. / Computer-Assisted provision of hormonal contraception in acute care settings. In: Contraception. 2013 ; Vol. 87, No. 2. pp. 242-250.
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