Complications and radiographic findings following cemented total hip replacement: A retrospective evaluation of 97 dogs

Mary Sarah Bergh, R. S. Gilley, F. S. Shofer, Amy Kapatkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cemented total hip replacement (cTHR) is commonly performed to treat intractable coxofemoral pain in dogs. While owners generally perceive a good outcome after the procedure, the longevity of the implant may be limited by complications such as infection and aseptic loosening. The objective of this retrospective study was to identify the prevalence of complications and radiographic changes following cTHR, and to identify factors that may predispose to a need for revision surgery. Medical records and radiographs from 97 dogs that underwent cTHR were evaluated for signalment, preoperative degree of osteoarthritis, technical errors, intra-operative culture results, and the post-operative radiographic appearance of the implant. The complications occurring in the intra-operative and short-term (< eight week) periods, and the radiographic appearance of the implant in the long-term (> eight week) time period were recorded. Mean (±SD) follow-up time was 1.1 ± 1.6 years (range: 0-7.7 years). Seven dogs had a short-term complication and a revision surgery was performed in eleven dogs. Osseous or cement changes were radiographically detectable in the majority of cTHR. Eccentric positioning of the femoral stem and the presence of radiolucent lines at the femoral cement-bone interface were positively associated with the occurrence of revision surgery. The clinical significance of the periprosthetic radiographic changes is unclear and further investigation is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-179
Number of pages8
JournalVeterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology
Volume19
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Hip Replacement Arthroplasties
hips
Reoperation
Dogs
surgery
dogs
thighs
cement
Thigh
Intractable Pain
Bone Cements
osteoarthritis
retrospective studies
Osteoarthritis
Medical Records
pain
Retrospective Studies
bones
stems
Infection

Keywords

  • Complications
  • Dog
  • Total hip

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Complications and radiographic findings following cemented total hip replacement : A retrospective evaluation of 97 dogs. / Bergh, Mary Sarah; Gilley, R. S.; Shofer, F. S.; Kapatkin, Amy.

In: Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Vol. 19, No. 3, 2006, p. 172-179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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