Complications and outcomes following rectal pull-through surgery in dogs with rectal masses

74 cases (2000–2013)

Daniel J. Nucci, Julius M. Liptak, Laura E. Selmic, William T Culp, April M. Durant, Deanna Worley, Karl C. Maritato, Maurine Thomson, Maurizio Annoni, Ameet Singh, Brad Matz, John Benson, Paolo Buracco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the incidence of and factors associated with complications following rectal pull-through (RPT) surgery and the outcome for dogs with rectal tumors.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—74 dogs with rectal masses.

Procedures—Information regarding signalment, history, diagnostic testing, type of rectal disease, surgical details, and postoperative complications, treatments, and outcomes was obtained from medical records and follow-up communications. Survival times were calculated. Descriptive statistics were generated. Regression analyses were used to evaluate the effect of various variables on the development of postsurgical complications and survival time.

Results—58 (78.4%) dogs developed postsurgical complications, the most common of which was fecal incontinence with 42 (56.8%) dogs affected, of which 23 (54.8%) developed permanent incontinence. Other complications included diarrhea (n = 32), tenesmus (23), stricture formation (16), rectal bleeding (8), constipation (7), dehiscence (6), and infection (4). The rectal tumor recurred in 10 dogs. The median survival time was 1,150 days for all dogs and 726 days for dogs with malignant tumors. The 2 most common rectal masses were rectal carcinoma and rectal carcinoma in situ, and the dogs with these tumors had median survival times of 696 and 1,006 days, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dogs with rectal diseases that underwent RPT surgery had a high incidence of complications; however, those dogs had good local tumor control and survival times. The risk and impact of postsurgical complications on the quality of life and oncological outcomes should be discussed with owners before RPT surgery is performed in dogs with rectal masses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)684-695
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume245
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2014

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surgery
Dogs
dogs
Rectal Diseases
Rectal Neoplasms
colorectal neoplasms
neoplasms
carcinoma
incidence
Neoplasms
Fecal Incontinence
constipation
postoperative complications
dehiscence
Incidence
Carcinoma in Situ
Constipation
communication (human)
quality of life
Medical Records

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Complications and outcomes following rectal pull-through surgery in dogs with rectal masses : 74 cases (2000–2013). / Nucci, Daniel J.; Liptak, Julius M.; Selmic, Laura E.; Culp, William T; Durant, April M.; Worley, Deanna; Maritato, Karl C.; Thomson, Maurine; Annoni, Maurizio; Singh, Ameet; Matz, Brad; Benson, John; Buracco, Paolo.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 245, No. 6, 15.09.2014, p. 684-695.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nucci, DJ, Liptak, JM, Selmic, LE, Culp, WT, Durant, AM, Worley, D, Maritato, KC, Thomson, M, Annoni, M, Singh, A, Matz, B, Benson, J & Buracco, P 2014, 'Complications and outcomes following rectal pull-through surgery in dogs with rectal masses: 74 cases (2000–2013)', Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 245, no. 6, pp. 684-695. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.245.6.684
Nucci, Daniel J. ; Liptak, Julius M. ; Selmic, Laura E. ; Culp, William T ; Durant, April M. ; Worley, Deanna ; Maritato, Karl C. ; Thomson, Maurine ; Annoni, Maurizio ; Singh, Ameet ; Matz, Brad ; Benson, John ; Buracco, Paolo. / Complications and outcomes following rectal pull-through surgery in dogs with rectal masses : 74 cases (2000–2013). In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2014 ; Vol. 245, No. 6. pp. 684-695.
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abstract = "Objective—To evaluate the incidence of and factors associated with complications following rectal pull-through (RPT) surgery and the outcome for dogs with rectal tumors.Design—Retrospective case series.Animals—74 dogs with rectal masses.Procedures—Information regarding signalment, history, diagnostic testing, type of rectal disease, surgical details, and postoperative complications, treatments, and outcomes was obtained from medical records and follow-up communications. Survival times were calculated. Descriptive statistics were generated. Regression analyses were used to evaluate the effect of various variables on the development of postsurgical complications and survival time.Results—58 (78.4{\%}) dogs developed postsurgical complications, the most common of which was fecal incontinence with 42 (56.8{\%}) dogs affected, of which 23 (54.8{\%}) developed permanent incontinence. Other complications included diarrhea (n = 32), tenesmus (23), stricture formation (16), rectal bleeding (8), constipation (7), dehiscence (6), and infection (4). The rectal tumor recurred in 10 dogs. The median survival time was 1,150 days for all dogs and 726 days for dogs with malignant tumors. The 2 most common rectal masses were rectal carcinoma and rectal carcinoma in situ, and the dogs with these tumors had median survival times of 696 and 1,006 days, respectively.Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dogs with rectal diseases that underwent RPT surgery had a high incidence of complications; however, those dogs had good local tumor control and survival times. The risk and impact of postsurgical complications on the quality of life and oncological outcomes should be discussed with owners before RPT surgery is performed in dogs with rectal masses.",
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T1 - Complications and outcomes following rectal pull-through surgery in dogs with rectal masses

T2 - 74 cases (2000–2013)

AU - Nucci, Daniel J.

AU - Liptak, Julius M.

AU - Selmic, Laura E.

AU - Culp, William T

AU - Durant, April M.

AU - Worley, Deanna

AU - Maritato, Karl C.

AU - Thomson, Maurine

AU - Annoni, Maurizio

AU - Singh, Ameet

AU - Matz, Brad

AU - Benson, John

AU - Buracco, Paolo

PY - 2014/9/15

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N2 - Objective—To evaluate the incidence of and factors associated with complications following rectal pull-through (RPT) surgery and the outcome for dogs with rectal tumors.Design—Retrospective case series.Animals—74 dogs with rectal masses.Procedures—Information regarding signalment, history, diagnostic testing, type of rectal disease, surgical details, and postoperative complications, treatments, and outcomes was obtained from medical records and follow-up communications. Survival times were calculated. Descriptive statistics were generated. Regression analyses were used to evaluate the effect of various variables on the development of postsurgical complications and survival time.Results—58 (78.4%) dogs developed postsurgical complications, the most common of which was fecal incontinence with 42 (56.8%) dogs affected, of which 23 (54.8%) developed permanent incontinence. Other complications included diarrhea (n = 32), tenesmus (23), stricture formation (16), rectal bleeding (8), constipation (7), dehiscence (6), and infection (4). The rectal tumor recurred in 10 dogs. The median survival time was 1,150 days for all dogs and 726 days for dogs with malignant tumors. The 2 most common rectal masses were rectal carcinoma and rectal carcinoma in situ, and the dogs with these tumors had median survival times of 696 and 1,006 days, respectively.Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dogs with rectal diseases that underwent RPT surgery had a high incidence of complications; however, those dogs had good local tumor control and survival times. The risk and impact of postsurgical complications on the quality of life and oncological outcomes should be discussed with owners before RPT surgery is performed in dogs with rectal masses.

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JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

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