Complications and outcomes associated with use of gastrostomy tubes for nutritional management of dogs with renal failure

56 Cases (1994-1999)

Denise A. Elliott, Darlene L. Riel, Quinton Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To evaluate complications and outcomes associated with use of gastrostomy tubes in dogs with renal failure. Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 56 dogs. Procedure - Medical records were reviewed for dogs with renal failure that were treated by use of gastrostomy tubes. Results - Mean ± SD BUN concentration was 134 ± 79 mg/dl and mean serum creatinine concentration was 9.0 ± 3.8 mg/dl. Low-profile gastrostomy tubes were used for initial placement in 10 dogs, and traditional gastrostomy tubes were used in 46 dogs. Mild stoma-site complications included discharge, swelling, erythema, and signs of pain in 26 (46%) of dogs. Twenty-six gastrostomy tubes were replaced in 15 dogs; 11 were replaced because of patient removal, 6 were replaced because of tube wear, and 3 were replaced for other reasons. Six tubes were replaced by low-profile gastrostomy tubes. Gastrostomy tubes were used for 65 ± 91 days (range, 1 to 438 days). Eight dogs gained weight, 11 did not change weight, and 17 lost weight; information was not available for 20 dogs. Three dogs were euthanatized because they removed their gastrostomy tubes, 2 were euthanatized because of evidence of tube migration, and 1 died of peritonitis. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Gastrostomy tubes appear to be safe and effective for improving nutritional status of dogs with renal failure. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1337-1342).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1337-1342
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume217
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2000

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Gastrostomy
renal failure
Renal Insufficiency
Dogs
dogs
Weights and Measures
erythema
peritonitis
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Erythema
Peritonitis
Nutritional Status
retrospective studies
stomata
creatinine
Medical Records
nutritional status
pain
Creatinine
Retrospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Complications and outcomes associated with use of gastrostomy tubes for nutritional management of dogs with renal failure: 56 Cases (1994-1999)",
abstract = "Objective - To evaluate complications and outcomes associated with use of gastrostomy tubes in dogs with renal failure. Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 56 dogs. Procedure - Medical records were reviewed for dogs with renal failure that were treated by use of gastrostomy tubes. Results - Mean ± SD BUN concentration was 134 ± 79 mg/dl and mean serum creatinine concentration was 9.0 ± 3.8 mg/dl. Low-profile gastrostomy tubes were used for initial placement in 10 dogs, and traditional gastrostomy tubes were used in 46 dogs. Mild stoma-site complications included discharge, swelling, erythema, and signs of pain in 26 (46{\%}) of dogs. Twenty-six gastrostomy tubes were replaced in 15 dogs; 11 were replaced because of patient removal, 6 were replaced because of tube wear, and 3 were replaced for other reasons. Six tubes were replaced by low-profile gastrostomy tubes. Gastrostomy tubes were used for 65 ± 91 days (range, 1 to 438 days). Eight dogs gained weight, 11 did not change weight, and 17 lost weight; information was not available for 20 dogs. Three dogs were euthanatized because they removed their gastrostomy tubes, 2 were euthanatized because of evidence of tube migration, and 1 died of peritonitis. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Gastrostomy tubes appear to be safe and effective for improving nutritional status of dogs with renal failure. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1337-1342).",
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AB - Objective - To evaluate complications and outcomes associated with use of gastrostomy tubes in dogs with renal failure. Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 56 dogs. Procedure - Medical records were reviewed for dogs with renal failure that were treated by use of gastrostomy tubes. Results - Mean ± SD BUN concentration was 134 ± 79 mg/dl and mean serum creatinine concentration was 9.0 ± 3.8 mg/dl. Low-profile gastrostomy tubes were used for initial placement in 10 dogs, and traditional gastrostomy tubes were used in 46 dogs. Mild stoma-site complications included discharge, swelling, erythema, and signs of pain in 26 (46%) of dogs. Twenty-six gastrostomy tubes were replaced in 15 dogs; 11 were replaced because of patient removal, 6 were replaced because of tube wear, and 3 were replaced for other reasons. Six tubes were replaced by low-profile gastrostomy tubes. Gastrostomy tubes were used for 65 ± 91 days (range, 1 to 438 days). Eight dogs gained weight, 11 did not change weight, and 17 lost weight; information was not available for 20 dogs. Three dogs were euthanatized because they removed their gastrostomy tubes, 2 were euthanatized because of evidence of tube migration, and 1 died of peritonitis. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Gastrostomy tubes appear to be safe and effective for improving nutritional status of dogs with renal failure. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1337-1342).

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