Complex family planning and pediatric hematology oncology integrated clinic for young people with blood disorders and heavy or abnormal menstrual bleeding

Melody Y. Hou, Sophia L. Davis, Matthew D. Ponzini, Machelle D. Wilson, Anjali Pawar, Juliana Melo, Melissa J. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To describe practice patterns of an integrated complex family planning-pediatric hematology oncology clinic for patients with blood disorders Study design: We retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of patients who had an initial consultation for blood disorders impacting menstrual bleeding in an integrated complex family planning-pediatric hematology oncology clinic from October 2015 to September 2020. We reviewed all charts to extract medical and gynecologic history, blood disorder diagnosis, hormonal treatment prior to and following initial consultation, subsequent visits to the integrated clinic, and hormonal treatment up to 24 months after initial consultation. Results: We saw 47 patients; their most common blood disorder diagnosis was protein defect (14 of 47, 30%). Most patients (30 of 47, 64%) were not using any hormonal treatment prior to their initial consultation. After the initial consultation, 26 (55%) elected to start, change, or discontinue hormonal treatment for abnormal menstrual bleeding, the most common treatment being combined hormonal contraception (CHC, 22 of 47, 47%), alone or as dual therapy. Over the study duration, 36 patients (77%) initiated, changed, or discontinued their hormone treatment, 22 (61%) of whom changed their treatment plan more than once. CHC usage decreased from 19 of 47 (40%) to 8 of 37 (22%) and hormonal device usage, particularly the implant, increased from 9 of 47 (19%) to 11 of 37 (30%) over the 24 months from initial consultation. Conclusion: Most patients in an integrated complex family planning-pediatric hematology oncology clinic will change their menstrual bleeding hormone treatment with initial consultation, although management may require multiple changes. The most common treatment 24 months following the initial consultation was hormonal devices. Implications: Patients with blood disorders affecting menstrual bleeding have complex needs that could be addressed by an integrated complex family planning-pediatric hematology oncology clinic. Most patients require multiple changes in treatment to achieve adequate control of their bleeding, and patients were more likely to choose hormonal devices for management over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalContraception
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Abnormal uterine bleeding
  • Bleeding disorders
  • Blood disorders
  • Complex family planning
  • Heavy menstrual bleeding
  • Hematology oncology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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