Comparison of the cardiovascular effects of equipotent anesthetic doses of sevofurane alone and sevofurane plus an intravenous infusion of lidocaine in horses

Ann E. Wagner, Khursheed R. Mama, Eugene Steffey, Tatiana H. Ferreira, Marlis L. Rezende

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Abstract

Objective-To compare cardiovascular effects of sevofurane alone and sevofurane plus an IV infusion of lidocaine in horses. Animals-8 adult horses. Procedures-Each horse was anesthetized twice via IV administration of xylazine, diazepam, and ketamine. During 1 anesthetic episode, anesthesia was maintained by administration of sevofurane in oxygen at 1. 0 and 1.5 times the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC). During the other episode, anesthesia was maintained at the same MAC multiples via a reduced concentration of sevofurane plus an IV infusion of lidocaine. Heart rate, arterial blood pressures, blood gas analyses, and cardiac output were measured during mechanical (controlled) ventilation at both 1.0 and 1.5 MAC for each anesthetic protocol and during spontaneous ventilation at 1 of the 2 MAC multiples. Results-Cardiorespiratory variables did not differ significantly between anesthetic protocols. Blood pressures were highest at 1.0 MAC during spontaneous ventilation and lowest at 1.5 MAC during controlled ventilation for either anesthetic protocol. Cardiac output was significantly higher during 1.0 MAC than during 1.5 MAC for sevofurane plus lidocaine but was not affected by anesthetic protocol or mode of ventilation. Clinically important hypotension was detected at 1.5 MAC for both anesthetic protocols. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Lidocaine infusion did not alter cardiorespiratory variables during anesthesia in horses, provided anesthetic depth was maintained constant. The IV administration of lidocaine to anesthetized nonstimulated horses should be used for reasons other than to improve cardiovascular performance. Severe hypotension can be expected in nonstimulated horses at 1.5 MAC sevofurane, regardless of whether lidocaine is administered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-460
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume72
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011

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lidocaine
Lidocaine
Intravenous Infusions
anesthetics
Horses
Anesthetics
horses
dosage
Ventilation
anesthesia
hypotension
cardiac output
Anesthesia
intravenous injection
blood pressure
Cardiac Output
Hypotension
depth of anesthesia
diazepam
Xylazine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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Comparison of the cardiovascular effects of equipotent anesthetic doses of sevofurane alone and sevofurane plus an intravenous infusion of lidocaine in horses. / Wagner, Ann E.; Mama, Khursheed R.; Steffey, Eugene; Ferreira, Tatiana H.; Rezende, Marlis L.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 72, No. 4, 01.04.2011, p. 452-460.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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