Comparison of temperature readings from a percutaneous thermal sensing microchip with temperature readings from a digital rectal thermometer in equids

Tatiana R. Robinson, Stephen B. Hussey, Ashley E Hill, Carl C. Heckendorf, Joe B. Stricklin, Josie L. Traub-Dargatz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To compare temperature readings from an implantable percutaneous thermal sensing microchip with temperature readings from a digital rectal thermometer, to identify factors that affect microchip readings, and to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of the microchip for fever detection. Design - Prospective study. Animals - 52 Welsh pony foals that were 6 to 10 months old and 30 Quarter Horses that were 2 years old. Procedures - Data were collected in summer, winter, and fall in groups 1 (n = 23 ponies), 2 (29 ponies), and 3 (30 Quarter Horses), respectively. Temperature readings from a digital rectal thermometer and a percutaneous thermal sensing microchip as well as ambient temperature were recorded daily for 17, 23, and 19 days in groups 1 through 3, respectively. Effects of ambient temperature and rectal temperature on thermal sensor readings were estimated. Sensitivity and specificity of the thermal sensor for detection of fever (rectal temperature, ≥ 38.9°C [102°F]) were estimated separately for data collection at ambient temperatures ≤ 15.6°C (60°F) and > 15.6°C. Results - Mean ambient temperatures were 29.0°C (84.2°F), -2.7°C (27.1°F), and 10.4°C (50.8°F) for groups 1 through 3, respectively. Thermal sensor readings varied with ambient temperature and rectal temperature. Rectal temperatures ranged from 36.2° to 41.7°C (97.2° to 107°F), whereas thermal sensor temperature readings ranged from 23.9° (75°F) to 42.2°C (75° to 108°F). Sensitivity for fever detection was 87.4%, 53.3%, and 58.3% in groups 1 to 3, respectively. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - The thermal sensor appeared to have potential use for initial screening of body temperature in equids at ambient temperatures > 15.6°C.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)613-617
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume233
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Thermometers
thermometers
Reading
Hot Temperature
heat
ambient temperature
Temperature
sensors (equipment)
temperature
fever
Quarter Horse
horses
Fever
Horses
prospective studies
foals
body temperature
Sensitivity and Specificity
screening
winter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Comparison of temperature readings from a percutaneous thermal sensing microchip with temperature readings from a digital rectal thermometer in equids. / Robinson, Tatiana R.; Hussey, Stephen B.; Hill, Ashley E; Heckendorf, Carl C.; Stricklin, Joe B.; Traub-Dargatz, Josie L.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 233, No. 4, 15.08.2008, p. 613-617.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robinson, Tatiana R. ; Hussey, Stephen B. ; Hill, Ashley E ; Heckendorf, Carl C. ; Stricklin, Joe B. ; Traub-Dargatz, Josie L. / Comparison of temperature readings from a percutaneous thermal sensing microchip with temperature readings from a digital rectal thermometer in equids. In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2008 ; Vol. 233, No. 4. pp. 613-617.
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