Comparison of results of hormonal analysis of samples obtained from selected venous sites versus cervical ultrasonography for localizing parathyroid masses in dogs

Edward C Feldman, Erik R Wisner, Richard W Nelson, Marsha S. Feldman, Peter C. Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To compare a technique in which samples obtained from selected venous sites are analyzed for parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentration versus usefulness of cervical ultrasonography for localizing primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) in dogs. Design - Prospective study. Animals - 12 dogs with PHP. Procedure - For each dog, blood samples were collected from the left and right jugular veins and 1 cephalic vein for determination of serum PTH concentration. Ultrasonography of the neck was performed in each dog. Each dog underwent exploratory surgery of the neck. Abnormal appearing parathyroid tissue was removed. Dogs were included in the study if serum calcium concentration decreased within 12 hours after surgery, hypercalcemia completely resolved within 96 hours after surgery, and serum calcium concentration was maintained within the reference range for at least 6 months after surgery. Results - Serum PTH concentrations from the 3 veins were similar in 11 of 12 dogs with PHP. In 1 dog, the serum PTH concentration from the jugular vein ipsilateral to a parathyroid adenoma was greater than that from the contralateral jugular or cephalic vein. Ultrasonography correctly identified a parathyroid mass and its location in 10 of 11 dogs with a solitary abnormal parathyroid gland and in 1 dog in which both parathyroid glands were enlarged. Clinical Implications - Surgeons may benefit from knowing the location of abnormal parathyroid tissue in dogs with PHP before surgical exploration. Ultrasonography has potential value for identifying and localizing abnormal parathyroid tissue, whereas sample collection from selected sites for PTH analysis is not likely to be helpful.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-56
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume211
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 1 1997

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ultrasonography
Ultrasonography
Dogs
dogs
parathyroid hormone
hyperparathyroidism
blood serum
Parathyroid Hormone
Primary Hyperparathyroidism
sampling
surgery
parathyroid glands
neck
Veins
Serum
Parathyroid Glands
Neck
Jugular Veins
jugular vein
Head

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Comparison of results of hormonal analysis of samples obtained from selected venous sites versus cervical ultrasonography for localizing parathyroid masses in dogs",
abstract = "Objective - To compare a technique in which samples obtained from selected venous sites are analyzed for parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentration versus usefulness of cervical ultrasonography for localizing primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) in dogs. Design - Prospective study. Animals - 12 dogs with PHP. Procedure - For each dog, blood samples were collected from the left and right jugular veins and 1 cephalic vein for determination of serum PTH concentration. Ultrasonography of the neck was performed in each dog. Each dog underwent exploratory surgery of the neck. Abnormal appearing parathyroid tissue was removed. Dogs were included in the study if serum calcium concentration decreased within 12 hours after surgery, hypercalcemia completely resolved within 96 hours after surgery, and serum calcium concentration was maintained within the reference range for at least 6 months after surgery. Results - Serum PTH concentrations from the 3 veins were similar in 11 of 12 dogs with PHP. In 1 dog, the serum PTH concentration from the jugular vein ipsilateral to a parathyroid adenoma was greater than that from the contralateral jugular or cephalic vein. Ultrasonography correctly identified a parathyroid mass and its location in 10 of 11 dogs with a solitary abnormal parathyroid gland and in 1 dog in which both parathyroid glands were enlarged. Clinical Implications - Surgeons may benefit from knowing the location of abnormal parathyroid tissue in dogs with PHP before surgical exploration. Ultrasonography has potential value for identifying and localizing abnormal parathyroid tissue, whereas sample collection from selected sites for PTH analysis is not likely to be helpful.",
author = "Feldman, {Edward C} and Wisner, {Erik R} and Nelson, {Richard W} and Feldman, {Marsha S.} and Kennedy, {Peter C.}",
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AU - Feldman, Edward C

AU - Wisner, Erik R

AU - Nelson, Richard W

AU - Feldman, Marsha S.

AU - Kennedy, Peter C.

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N2 - Objective - To compare a technique in which samples obtained from selected venous sites are analyzed for parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentration versus usefulness of cervical ultrasonography for localizing primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) in dogs. Design - Prospective study. Animals - 12 dogs with PHP. Procedure - For each dog, blood samples were collected from the left and right jugular veins and 1 cephalic vein for determination of serum PTH concentration. Ultrasonography of the neck was performed in each dog. Each dog underwent exploratory surgery of the neck. Abnormal appearing parathyroid tissue was removed. Dogs were included in the study if serum calcium concentration decreased within 12 hours after surgery, hypercalcemia completely resolved within 96 hours after surgery, and serum calcium concentration was maintained within the reference range for at least 6 months after surgery. Results - Serum PTH concentrations from the 3 veins were similar in 11 of 12 dogs with PHP. In 1 dog, the serum PTH concentration from the jugular vein ipsilateral to a parathyroid adenoma was greater than that from the contralateral jugular or cephalic vein. Ultrasonography correctly identified a parathyroid mass and its location in 10 of 11 dogs with a solitary abnormal parathyroid gland and in 1 dog in which both parathyroid glands were enlarged. Clinical Implications - Surgeons may benefit from knowing the location of abnormal parathyroid tissue in dogs with PHP before surgical exploration. Ultrasonography has potential value for identifying and localizing abnormal parathyroid tissue, whereas sample collection from selected sites for PTH analysis is not likely to be helpful.

AB - Objective - To compare a technique in which samples obtained from selected venous sites are analyzed for parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentration versus usefulness of cervical ultrasonography for localizing primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) in dogs. Design - Prospective study. Animals - 12 dogs with PHP. Procedure - For each dog, blood samples were collected from the left and right jugular veins and 1 cephalic vein for determination of serum PTH concentration. Ultrasonography of the neck was performed in each dog. Each dog underwent exploratory surgery of the neck. Abnormal appearing parathyroid tissue was removed. Dogs were included in the study if serum calcium concentration decreased within 12 hours after surgery, hypercalcemia completely resolved within 96 hours after surgery, and serum calcium concentration was maintained within the reference range for at least 6 months after surgery. Results - Serum PTH concentrations from the 3 veins were similar in 11 of 12 dogs with PHP. In 1 dog, the serum PTH concentration from the jugular vein ipsilateral to a parathyroid adenoma was greater than that from the contralateral jugular or cephalic vein. Ultrasonography correctly identified a parathyroid mass and its location in 10 of 11 dogs with a solitary abnormal parathyroid gland and in 1 dog in which both parathyroid glands were enlarged. Clinical Implications - Surgeons may benefit from knowing the location of abnormal parathyroid tissue in dogs with PHP before surgical exploration. Ultrasonography has potential value for identifying and localizing abnormal parathyroid tissue, whereas sample collection from selected sites for PTH analysis is not likely to be helpful.

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