Comparison of five measures of motivation to quit smoking among a sample of hospitalized smokers

Christopher N. Sciamanna, Jeffrey S Hoch, G. Christine Duke, Morris N. Fogle, Daniel E. Ford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare the predictive validity of several measures of motivation to quit smoking among inpatients enrolled in a smoking cessation program. METHODS: Data collected during face-to-face counseling sessions included a standard measure of motivation to quit (stage of readiness [Stage]: precontemplation, contemplation, or preparation) and four items with responses grouped in three categories: 'How much do you want to quit smoking' (Want), 'How likely is it that you will stay off cigarettes after you leave the hospital' (Likely), 'Rate your confidence on a scale from 0 to 100 about successfully quitting in the next month' (Confidence), and a counselor assessment in response to the question, 'How motivated is this patient to quit?' (Motivation). Patients were classified as nonsmokers if they reported not smoking at both the 6-month and 12-month interviews. All patients lost to follow-up were considered smokers. MAIN RESULTS: At 1 year, the smoking cessation rate was 22.5%. Each measure of motivation to quit was independently associated with cessation (p < .001) when added individually to an adjusted model. Likely was most closely associated with cessation and Stage was least. Likely had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and likelihood ratio of 70.2%, 68.1%, 39.3%, 88.6%, and 2.2, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The motivation of inpatient smokers to quit may be as easily and as accurately predicted with a single question as with the series of questions that are typically used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-23
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Motivation
Smoking
Smoking Cessation
Inpatients
Lost to Follow-Up
Tobacco Products
Counseling
Interviews
Sensitivity and Specificity

Keywords

  • Inpatients
  • Motivation
  • Predictive validity
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Comparison of five measures of motivation to quit smoking among a sample of hospitalized smokers. / Sciamanna, Christopher N.; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Duke, G. Christine; Fogle, Morris N.; Ford, Daniel E.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2000, p. 16-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sciamanna, Christopher N. ; Hoch, Jeffrey S ; Duke, G. Christine ; Fogle, Morris N. ; Ford, Daniel E. / Comparison of five measures of motivation to quit smoking among a sample of hospitalized smokers. In: Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 16-23.
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