Comparison of fecal samples collected per rectum and off the ground for estimation of environmental contamination attributable to beef cattle

Bruce R. Hoar, Edward R Atwill, Cyrus Elmi, William W. Utterback, Anita J. Edmondson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives - To determine whether sampling feces off the ground replicates prevalence estimates for specific pathogens obtained from fecal samples collected per rectum of adult cows, and to determine characteristics of feces on the ground (fecal pats) that are associated with subsequent identification of Campylobacter spp, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Giardia duodenalis. Animals - A random sample of adult beef cattle from 25 herds located throughout California. Procedure - 1,115 rectal and ground fecal samples were obtained. Samples were submitted for culture of Campylobacter spp and examined, using a direct fluorescent antibody assay, to detect C parvum oocysts and G duodenalis cysts. Characteristics of fecal pats, such as volume and consistency, were recorded. Results-Prevalence of Campylobacter spp was 5.0% (20/401) for rectal fecal samples, which was significantly greater than prevalence determined for ground fecal samples (2/402; 0.5%). Most isolates were C jejuni subsp jejuni. Prevalence of C parvum was higher in rectal fecal samples (6/557; 1.1%) than in ground fecal samples (1/558; 0.2%), but this difference was not significant. Prevalence of G duodenalis did not differ for rectal (36/557; 6.5%) versus ground (26/558; 4.7%) fecal samples. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Evaluation of ground fecal samples may not accurately indicate the prevalence of Campylobacter spp or C parvum in cattle but may reflect prevalence of G duodenalis. Differences in prevalence estimates between the 2 methods suggest inactivation of pathogens in feces after cattle have defecated. Prevalence estimates generated by evaluation of ground fecal samples, however, may more accurately estimate environmental pathogen burden.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1352-1356
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume60
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1999

Fingerprint

rectum
Rectum
beef cattle
pollution
Campylobacter
Feces
sampling
feces
Cryptosporidium parvum
pathogens
Giardia lamblia
Oocysts
Cysts
cattle
oocysts
inactivation
Antibodies
herds
cows

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Comparison of fecal samples collected per rectum and off the ground for estimation of environmental contamination attributable to beef cattle. / Hoar, Bruce R.; Atwill, Edward R; Elmi, Cyrus; Utterback, William W.; Edmondson, Anita J.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 60, No. 11, 11.1999, p. 1352-1356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives - To determine whether sampling feces off the ground replicates prevalence estimates for specific pathogens obtained from fecal samples collected per rectum of adult cows, and to determine characteristics of feces on the ground (fecal pats) that are associated with subsequent identification of Campylobacter spp, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Giardia duodenalis. Animals - A random sample of adult beef cattle from 25 herds located throughout California. Procedure - 1,115 rectal and ground fecal samples were obtained. Samples were submitted for culture of Campylobacter spp and examined, using a direct fluorescent antibody assay, to detect C parvum oocysts and G duodenalis cysts. Characteristics of fecal pats, such as volume and consistency, were recorded. Results-Prevalence of Campylobacter spp was 5.0{\%} (20/401) for rectal fecal samples, which was significantly greater than prevalence determined for ground fecal samples (2/402; 0.5{\%}). Most isolates were C jejuni subsp jejuni. Prevalence of C parvum was higher in rectal fecal samples (6/557; 1.1{\%}) than in ground fecal samples (1/558; 0.2{\%}), but this difference was not significant. Prevalence of G duodenalis did not differ for rectal (36/557; 6.5{\%}) versus ground (26/558; 4.7{\%}) fecal samples. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Evaluation of ground fecal samples may not accurately indicate the prevalence of Campylobacter spp or C parvum in cattle but may reflect prevalence of G duodenalis. Differences in prevalence estimates between the 2 methods suggest inactivation of pathogens in feces after cattle have defecated. Prevalence estimates generated by evaluation of ground fecal samples, however, may more accurately estimate environmental pathogen burden.",
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