Comparison of Endothelial Differentiation Capacities of Human and Rat Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

Hakan Orbay, Kamaljit Devi, Priscilla A. Williams, Tima Dehghani, Eduardo Silva, David E Sahar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: The authors compared the endothelial differentiation capacities of human and rat adipose-derived stem cells to determine whether human adipose-derived stem cells can be a source of endothelial cells clinically. Methods: Human and rat adipose-derived stem cells were harvested and characterized with flow cytometry and trilineage differentiation. Cells from passages III through V were fed with endothelial cell differentiation medium for up to 3 weeks. Cells were harvested after 1, 2, and 3 weeks, and endothelial differentiation was evaluated with quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and angiogenic sprouting assays. Results: Both human and rat adipose-derived stem cells were CD90 +, CD44 +, and CD31 - before differentiation. The cells were successfully differentiated into adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. Expression of endothelial cell-specific genes peaked at the second week of differentiation in both human and rat cells. The fold changes in expression of CD31, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1, nitric oxide synthase, and von Willebrand factor genes at week 2 were 0.4 ± 0.1, 34.7 ± 0.3, 2.03 ± 0.25, and 12.5 ± 0.3 respectively, in human adipose-derived stem cells; and 1.5 ± 1.01, 21.6 ± 1.7, 17.9 ± 0.6, and 11.2 ± 1.3, respectively, in rat cells. The percentages of CD31 + cells were 0.2, 0.64, and 1.6 in human cell populations and 0.5, 5.91, and 11.5 in rat cell populations at weeks 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Rat adipose-derived stem cell-derived endothelial cells displayed enhanced sprouting capability compared with the human cells. Conclusions: Human adipose-derived stem cells responded less strongly to EGM-2MV endothelial differentiation medium than did the rat cells. Still, the human cells have the potential to become a clinical source of endothelial cells with modifications in the differentiation conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1231-1241
Number of pages11
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume138
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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Stem Cells
Endothelial Cells
Flow Cytometry
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1
von Willebrand Factor
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Nitric Oxide Synthase
Population
Genes
Cell Differentiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Comparison of Endothelial Differentiation Capacities of Human and Rat Adipose-Derived Stem Cells. / Orbay, Hakan; Devi, Kamaljit; Williams, Priscilla A.; Dehghani, Tima; Silva, Eduardo; Sahar, David E.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 138, No. 6, 01.12.2016, p. 1231-1241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Orbay, Hakan ; Devi, Kamaljit ; Williams, Priscilla A. ; Dehghani, Tima ; Silva, Eduardo ; Sahar, David E. / Comparison of Endothelial Differentiation Capacities of Human and Rat Adipose-Derived Stem Cells. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2016 ; Vol. 138, No. 6. pp. 1231-1241.
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abstract = "Background: The authors compared the endothelial differentiation capacities of human and rat adipose-derived stem cells to determine whether human adipose-derived stem cells can be a source of endothelial cells clinically. Methods: Human and rat adipose-derived stem cells were harvested and characterized with flow cytometry and trilineage differentiation. Cells from passages III through V were fed with endothelial cell differentiation medium for up to 3 weeks. Cells were harvested after 1, 2, and 3 weeks, and endothelial differentiation was evaluated with quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and angiogenic sprouting assays. Results: Both human and rat adipose-derived stem cells were CD90 +, CD44 +, and CD31 - before differentiation. The cells were successfully differentiated into adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. Expression of endothelial cell-specific genes peaked at the second week of differentiation in both human and rat cells. The fold changes in expression of CD31, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1, nitric oxide synthase, and von Willebrand factor genes at week 2 were 0.4 ± 0.1, 34.7 ± 0.3, 2.03 ± 0.25, and 12.5 ± 0.3 respectively, in human adipose-derived stem cells; and 1.5 ± 1.01, 21.6 ± 1.7, 17.9 ± 0.6, and 11.2 ± 1.3, respectively, in rat cells. The percentages of CD31 + cells were 0.2, 0.64, and 1.6 in human cell populations and 0.5, 5.91, and 11.5 in rat cell populations at weeks 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Rat adipose-derived stem cell-derived endothelial cells displayed enhanced sprouting capability compared with the human cells. Conclusions: Human adipose-derived stem cells responded less strongly to EGM-2MV endothelial differentiation medium than did the rat cells. Still, the human cells have the potential to become a clinical source of endothelial cells with modifications in the differentiation conditions.",
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AU - Silva, Eduardo

AU - Sahar, David E

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