Comparison of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli obtained from drinking water sources in northern Tanzania: a cross-sectional study

Beatus Lyimo, Joram Buza, Murugan Subbiah, Woutrina A Smith, Douglas R. Call

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing and significant threat to public health on a global scale. Escherichia coli comprises Gram-negative, fecal-borne pathogenic and commensal bacteria that are frequently associated with antibiotic resistance. AMR E. coli can be ingested via food, water and direct contact with fecal contamination. Methods: We estimated the prevalence of AMR Escherichia coli from select drinking water sources in northern Tanzania. Water samples (n = 155) were collected and plated onto Hi-Crome E. coli and MacConkey agar. Presumptive E. coli were confirmed by using a uidA PCR assay. Antibiotic susceptibility breakpoint assays were used to determine the resistance patterns of each isolate for 10 antibiotics. Isolates were also characterized by select PCR genotyping and macro-restriction digest assays. Results: E. coli was isolated from 71 % of the water samples, and of the 1819 E. coli tested, 46.9 % were resistant to one or more antibiotics. Resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and trimethoprim was significantly higher (15-30 %) compared to other tested antibiotics (0-6 %; P < 0.05). Of the β-lactam-resistant isolates, bla TEM-1 was predominant (67 %) followed by bla CTX-M (17.7 %) and bla SHV-1 (6.0 %). Among the tetracycline-resistant isolates, tet(A) was predominant (57.4 %) followed by tet(B) (24.0 %). E. coli isolates obtained from these water sources were genetically diverse with few matching macro-restriction digest patterns. Conclusion: Water supplies in northern Tanzania may be a source of AMR E. coli for people and animals. Further studies are needed to identify the source of these contaminants and devise effective intervention strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalBMC Microbiology
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 3 2016

Fingerprint

Tanzania
Drinking Water
Cross-Sectional Studies
Escherichia coli
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Water
Tetracycline
Ampicillin Resistance
Lactams
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Water Supply
Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination Trimethoprim
Streptomycin
Microbial Drug Resistance
Agar
Public Health
Bacteria
Food

Keywords

  • Antibiotic resistance
  • Low-income country
  • Tanzania
  • Water quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Comparison of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli obtained from drinking water sources in northern Tanzania : a cross-sectional study. / Lyimo, Beatus; Buza, Joram; Subbiah, Murugan; Smith, Woutrina A; Call, Douglas R.

In: BMC Microbiology, Vol. 16, No. 1, 03.11.2016, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Comparison of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli obtained from drinking water sources in northern Tanzania: a cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Background: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing and significant threat to public health on a global scale. Escherichia coli comprises Gram-negative, fecal-borne pathogenic and commensal bacteria that are frequently associated with antibiotic resistance. AMR E. coli can be ingested via food, water and direct contact with fecal contamination. Methods: We estimated the prevalence of AMR Escherichia coli from select drinking water sources in northern Tanzania. Water samples (n = 155) were collected and plated onto Hi-Crome E. coli and MacConkey agar. Presumptive E. coli were confirmed by using a uidA PCR assay. Antibiotic susceptibility breakpoint assays were used to determine the resistance patterns of each isolate for 10 antibiotics. Isolates were also characterized by select PCR genotyping and macro-restriction digest assays. Results: E. coli was isolated from 71 {\%} of the water samples, and of the 1819 E. coli tested, 46.9 {\%} were resistant to one or more antibiotics. Resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and trimethoprim was significantly higher (15-30 {\%}) compared to other tested antibiotics (0-6 {\%}; P < 0.05). Of the β-lactam-resistant isolates, bla TEM-1 was predominant (67 {\%}) followed by bla CTX-M (17.7 {\%}) and bla SHV-1 (6.0 {\%}). Among the tetracycline-resistant isolates, tet(A) was predominant (57.4 {\%}) followed by tet(B) (24.0 {\%}). E. coli isolates obtained from these water sources were genetically diverse with few matching macro-restriction digest patterns. Conclusion: Water supplies in northern Tanzania may be a source of AMR E. coli for people and animals. Further studies are needed to identify the source of these contaminants and devise effective intervention strategies.",
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AB - Background: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing and significant threat to public health on a global scale. Escherichia coli comprises Gram-negative, fecal-borne pathogenic and commensal bacteria that are frequently associated with antibiotic resistance. AMR E. coli can be ingested via food, water and direct contact with fecal contamination. Methods: We estimated the prevalence of AMR Escherichia coli from select drinking water sources in northern Tanzania. Water samples (n = 155) were collected and plated onto Hi-Crome E. coli and MacConkey agar. Presumptive E. coli were confirmed by using a uidA PCR assay. Antibiotic susceptibility breakpoint assays were used to determine the resistance patterns of each isolate for 10 antibiotics. Isolates were also characterized by select PCR genotyping and macro-restriction digest assays. Results: E. coli was isolated from 71 % of the water samples, and of the 1819 E. coli tested, 46.9 % were resistant to one or more antibiotics. Resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and trimethoprim was significantly higher (15-30 %) compared to other tested antibiotics (0-6 %; P < 0.05). Of the β-lactam-resistant isolates, bla TEM-1 was predominant (67 %) followed by bla CTX-M (17.7 %) and bla SHV-1 (6.0 %). Among the tetracycline-resistant isolates, tet(A) was predominant (57.4 %) followed by tet(B) (24.0 %). E. coli isolates obtained from these water sources were genetically diverse with few matching macro-restriction digest patterns. Conclusion: Water supplies in northern Tanzania may be a source of AMR E. coli for people and animals. Further studies are needed to identify the source of these contaminants and devise effective intervention strategies.

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