Comparative study of the intrinsic mechanical properties of the human acetabular and femoral head cartilage

K. A. Athanasiou, A. Agarwal, F. J. Dzida

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Using the biphasic creep indentation methodology and our new automated indentation apparatus, we obtained the intrinsic material properties and thickness of normal articular cartilage in ten human hip joints. The results indicate that significant differences exist in these properties topographically in the acetabulum and femoral head, and between these two anatomical structures. Articular cartilage in the area below the fovea has the smallest compressive modulus. Cartilage in the supero-medial aspect of the femoral head has the largest compressive modulus. In the anatomical position, the significantly stiffer supero-medial portion of the femoral head articulates with the supero-medial portion of the acetabulum. During sitting, the inferior portion of the femoral head is in contact with the significantly stiffer anterior acetabulum. These findings corroborate the clinical observation that the inferior portion of the femoral head and the superior portion of the acetabulum degenerate more frequently. This may be due to mismatch in their compressive modulus with that of their opposing surfaces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED
Place of PublicationNew York, NY, United States
PublisherPubl by ASME
Pages457-460
Number of pages4
Volume20
ISBN (Print)0791808890
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes
EventWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers - Atlanta, GA, USA
Duration: Dec 1 1991Dec 6 1991

Other

OtherWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers
CityAtlanta, GA, USA
Period12/1/9112/6/91

Fingerprint

Cartilage
Indentation
Mechanical properties
Materials properties
Creep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Athanasiou, K. A., Agarwal, A., & Dzida, F. J. (1991). Comparative study of the intrinsic mechanical properties of the human acetabular and femoral head cartilage. In American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED (Vol. 20, pp. 457-460). New York, NY, United States: Publ by ASME.

Comparative study of the intrinsic mechanical properties of the human acetabular and femoral head cartilage. / Athanasiou, K. A.; Agarwal, A.; Dzida, F. J.

American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. Vol. 20 New York, NY, United States : Publ by ASME, 1991. p. 457-460.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Athanasiou, KA, Agarwal, A & Dzida, FJ 1991, Comparative study of the intrinsic mechanical properties of the human acetabular and femoral head cartilage. in American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. vol. 20, Publ by ASME, New York, NY, United States, pp. 457-460, Winter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Atlanta, GA, USA, 12/1/91.
Athanasiou KA, Agarwal A, Dzida FJ. Comparative study of the intrinsic mechanical properties of the human acetabular and femoral head cartilage. In American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. Vol. 20. New York, NY, United States: Publ by ASME. 1991. p. 457-460
Athanasiou, K. A. ; Agarwal, A. ; Dzida, F. J. / Comparative study of the intrinsic mechanical properties of the human acetabular and femoral head cartilage. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. Vol. 20 New York, NY, United States : Publ by ASME, 1991. pp. 457-460
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