Comparative pathogenicity of wild life and bovine escherichia coli O157: H7 strains in experimentally inoculated neonatal jersey calves

Elizabeth M. Antaki-Zukoski, Xunde Li, Patricia Pesavento, Tran H.B. Nguyen, Bruce R. Hoar, Edward R Atwill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, like E. coli O157:H7, are important human and animal pathogens. Naturally-acquired E. coli O157:H7 infections occur in numerous species but, particularly, cattle have been identified as a significant reservoir for human cases. E. coli O157:H7 are isolated from a number of domestic and wild animals, including rodents that share a living space with cattle. These Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 strains can be highly virulent in humans, but little is known about the sequelae of interspecies transfer. In a group of neonatal calves, we determined the differences in colonization patterns and lesions associated with infection using either a wildlife or bovine E. coli O157:H7 strain. In calves challenged with the wildlife E. coli O157:H7 strain, the large (descending) colon was solely colonized, which differed substantially from the calves inoculated with the bovine E. coli O157:H7 strain, where the spiral colon was the principal target of infection. This study also demonstrated that while both interspecies- and intraspecies-derived E. coli O157:H7 can infect young calves, the distribution and severity differs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number88
JournalVeterinary Sciences
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Keywords

  • Bovine
  • Escherichia coli O157:H7
  • Interspecies transfer
  • Intraspecies transfer
  • Wildlife

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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