Comparative immunology of allergic responses

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Allergic responses occur in humans, rodents, non-human primates, avian species, and all of the domestic animals. These responses are mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies that bind to mast cells and cause release/synthesis of potent mediators. Clinical syndromes include naturally occurring asthma in humans and cats; atopic dermatitis in humans, dogs, horses, and several other species; food allergies; and anaphylactic shock. Experimental induction of asthma in mice, rats, monkeys, sheep, and cats has helped to reveal mechanisms of pathogenesis of asthma in humans. All of these species share the ability to develop a rapid and often fatal response to systemic administration of an allergen - anaphylactic shock. Genetic predisposition to development of allergic disease (atopy) has been demonstrated in humans, dogs, and horses. Application of mouse models of IgE-mediated allergic asthma has provided evidence for a role of air pollutants (ozone, diesel exhaust, environmental tobacco smoke) in enhanced sensitization to allergens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-346
Number of pages20
JournalAnnual Review of Animal Biosciences
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

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Keywords

  • anaphylaxis
  • animal models
  • asthma
  • IgE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)
  • Biotechnology
  • Genetics

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