Comparative genomics

Lessons from cats

Stephen J. O'Brien, Johannes Wienberg, Leslie A Lyons

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The genomics era, spearheaded by dazzling technological developments in human and mouse gene mapping, has additionally provoked extensive comparative gene mapping projects for domestic species of several vertebrate orders. As the human genome proJect promises a one dimensional string of 100 000 genes and sequences, comparative mapping will extend that inference to a second dimension representing index species of the 20 living mammalian orders and to a third dimension by phylogenetic description of the genomes of mammal ancestors. We review here the remarkable extent of genome homology conservation among mammals illustrated by technology applications in the feline genome project.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-399
Number of pages7
JournalTrends in Genetics
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Genomics
Cats
Chromosome Mapping
Genome
Mammals
Human Genome Project
Felidae
Human Development
Vertebrates
Technology
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Cite this

Comparative genomics : Lessons from cats. / O'Brien, Stephen J.; Wienberg, Johannes; Lyons, Leslie A.

In: Trends in Genetics, Vol. 13, No. 10, 10.1997, p. 393-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

O'Brien, Stephen J. ; Wienberg, Johannes ; Lyons, Leslie A. / Comparative genomics : Lessons from cats. In: Trends in Genetics. 1997 ; Vol. 13, No. 10. pp. 393-399.
@article{f4e1ec7119cb4ce680f6c5c119b25f50,
title = "Comparative genomics: Lessons from cats",
abstract = "The genomics era, spearheaded by dazzling technological developments in human and mouse gene mapping, has additionally provoked extensive comparative gene mapping projects for domestic species of several vertebrate orders. As the human genome proJect promises a one dimensional string of 100 000 genes and sequences, comparative mapping will extend that inference to a second dimension representing index species of the 20 living mammalian orders and to a third dimension by phylogenetic description of the genomes of mammal ancestors. We review here the remarkable extent of genome homology conservation among mammals illustrated by technology applications in the feline genome project.",
author = "O'Brien, {Stephen J.} and Johannes Wienberg and Lyons, {Leslie A}",
year = "1997",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/S0168-9525(97)01297-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "393--399",
journal = "Trends in Genetics",
issn = "0168-9525",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparative genomics

T2 - Lessons from cats

AU - O'Brien, Stephen J.

AU - Wienberg, Johannes

AU - Lyons, Leslie A

PY - 1997/10

Y1 - 1997/10

N2 - The genomics era, spearheaded by dazzling technological developments in human and mouse gene mapping, has additionally provoked extensive comparative gene mapping projects for domestic species of several vertebrate orders. As the human genome proJect promises a one dimensional string of 100 000 genes and sequences, comparative mapping will extend that inference to a second dimension representing index species of the 20 living mammalian orders and to a third dimension by phylogenetic description of the genomes of mammal ancestors. We review here the remarkable extent of genome homology conservation among mammals illustrated by technology applications in the feline genome project.

AB - The genomics era, spearheaded by dazzling technological developments in human and mouse gene mapping, has additionally provoked extensive comparative gene mapping projects for domestic species of several vertebrate orders. As the human genome proJect promises a one dimensional string of 100 000 genes and sequences, comparative mapping will extend that inference to a second dimension representing index species of the 20 living mammalian orders and to a third dimension by phylogenetic description of the genomes of mammal ancestors. We review here the remarkable extent of genome homology conservation among mammals illustrated by technology applications in the feline genome project.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030769509&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030769509&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0168-9525(97)01297-3

DO - 10.1016/S0168-9525(97)01297-3

M3 - Review article

VL - 13

SP - 393

EP - 399

JO - Trends in Genetics

JF - Trends in Genetics

SN - 0168-9525

IS - 10

ER -