Comparative assessment of the effect of lomefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and placebo on cerebral blood flow, and glucose and oxygen metabolism in healthy subjects by positron emission tomography

E. M. Bednarczyk, J. A. Green, A. D. Nelson, G. P. Leisure, D. Little, L. P. Adler, Edward A Panacek, E. A. Panacek, F. D. Miraldi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The mechanism by which the fluorinated quinolones produce central nervous system (CNS) effects is currently unknown. We measured the effect of lomefloxacin on cerebral blood flow and metabolism using positron emission tomography. Eighteen healthy, nonsmoking volunteers were randomized to receive lomefloxacin 400 mg, ciprofloxacin 750 mg, or placebo given in a single-blind fashion every 12 hours for 72 hours, the time window for maximum lomefloxacin CNS effects. Subjects receiving lomefloxacin had a mean (± SEM) cerebral blood flow (CBF) of 46 (2.9) ml/min/100 g, glucose metabolism (FDG) 4.7 (0.4) mg/min/100 g, oxygen metabolism (OM) 3.3 (0.3) ml/min/100 g, and oxygen extraction (%OM) 0.4 (0.04). Posttreatment values were 43 (3.6) ml/min/100 g, 4.2 (0.4) mg/min/100 g, 2.6 (0.3) ml/min/100 g, and 0.4 (0.03), respectively. Values for subjects receiving ciprofloxacin were CBF 44.8 (1.6) ml/min/100 g, FDG 4.9 (0.7) mg/min/100 g, OM 4.1 (0.4) ml/min/100 g, and %OM 0.6 (0.03) at baseline, and 40.3 (3.5), 4.5 (0.6), 3.4 (0.4), and 0.5 (0.09), respectively, after treatment. For placebo-treated subjects, baseline values were CBF 41.4 (1.9) ml/min/100 g, FDG 4.9 (0.5) mg/min/100 g, OM 3.3 (0.4) ml/min/100 g, and %OM 0.5 (0.07), and respective posttreatment values were 42.1 (2.3), 5.0 (0.6), 3.5 (0.3), and 0.5 (0.02). No effect was observed on visual (qualitative), blinded reading of the scans. No significant effect on cerebral blood flow or metabolism was detected. We conclude that short-term administration of lomefloxacin or ciprofloxacin to healthy volunteers does not have a significant effect on cerebral blood flow, or on oxygen or glucose metabolism. Trends toward decreased metabolism in the quinolone-treated subjects are consistent with findings from other published trials, although their significance is unclear.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-375
Number of pages7
JournalPharmacotherapy
Volume12
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Cerebrovascular Circulation
Ciprofloxacin
Positron-Emission Tomography
Blood Glucose
Healthy Volunteers
Placebos
Oxygen
Quinolones
lomefloxacin
Central Nervous System
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Bednarczyk, E. M., Green, J. A., Nelson, A. D., Leisure, G. P., Little, D., Adler, L. P., ... Miraldi, F. D. (1992). Comparative assessment of the effect of lomefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and placebo on cerebral blood flow, and glucose and oxygen metabolism in healthy subjects by positron emission tomography. Pharmacotherapy, 12(5), 369-375.

Comparative assessment of the effect of lomefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and placebo on cerebral blood flow, and glucose and oxygen metabolism in healthy subjects by positron emission tomography. / Bednarczyk, E. M.; Green, J. A.; Nelson, A. D.; Leisure, G. P.; Little, D.; Adler, L. P.; Panacek, Edward A; Panacek, E. A.; Miraldi, F. D.

In: Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 12, No. 5, 1992, p. 369-375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bednarczyk, E. M. ; Green, J. A. ; Nelson, A. D. ; Leisure, G. P. ; Little, D. ; Adler, L. P. ; Panacek, Edward A ; Panacek, E. A. ; Miraldi, F. D. / Comparative assessment of the effect of lomefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and placebo on cerebral blood flow, and glucose and oxygen metabolism in healthy subjects by positron emission tomography. In: Pharmacotherapy. 1992 ; Vol. 12, No. 5. pp. 369-375.
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abstract = "The mechanism by which the fluorinated quinolones produce central nervous system (CNS) effects is currently unknown. We measured the effect of lomefloxacin on cerebral blood flow and metabolism using positron emission tomography. Eighteen healthy, nonsmoking volunteers were randomized to receive lomefloxacin 400 mg, ciprofloxacin 750 mg, or placebo given in a single-blind fashion every 12 hours for 72 hours, the time window for maximum lomefloxacin CNS effects. Subjects receiving lomefloxacin had a mean (± SEM) cerebral blood flow (CBF) of 46 (2.9) ml/min/100 g, glucose metabolism (FDG) 4.7 (0.4) mg/min/100 g, oxygen metabolism (OM) 3.3 (0.3) ml/min/100 g, and oxygen extraction ({\%}OM) 0.4 (0.04). Posttreatment values were 43 (3.6) ml/min/100 g, 4.2 (0.4) mg/min/100 g, 2.6 (0.3) ml/min/100 g, and 0.4 (0.03), respectively. Values for subjects receiving ciprofloxacin were CBF 44.8 (1.6) ml/min/100 g, FDG 4.9 (0.7) mg/min/100 g, OM 4.1 (0.4) ml/min/100 g, and {\%}OM 0.6 (0.03) at baseline, and 40.3 (3.5), 4.5 (0.6), 3.4 (0.4), and 0.5 (0.09), respectively, after treatment. For placebo-treated subjects, baseline values were CBF 41.4 (1.9) ml/min/100 g, FDG 4.9 (0.5) mg/min/100 g, OM 3.3 (0.4) ml/min/100 g, and {\%}OM 0.5 (0.07), and respective posttreatment values were 42.1 (2.3), 5.0 (0.6), 3.5 (0.3), and 0.5 (0.02). No effect was observed on visual (qualitative), blinded reading of the scans. No significant effect on cerebral blood flow or metabolism was detected. We conclude that short-term administration of lomefloxacin or ciprofloxacin to healthy volunteers does not have a significant effect on cerebral blood flow, or on oxygen or glucose metabolism. Trends toward decreased metabolism in the quinolone-treated subjects are consistent with findings from other published trials, although their significance is unclear.",
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T1 - Comparative assessment of the effect of lomefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and placebo on cerebral blood flow, and glucose and oxygen metabolism in healthy subjects by positron emission tomography

AU - Bednarczyk, E. M.

AU - Green, J. A.

AU - Nelson, A. D.

AU - Leisure, G. P.

AU - Little, D.

AU - Adler, L. P.

AU - Panacek, Edward A

AU - Panacek, E. A.

AU - Miraldi, F. D.

PY - 1992

Y1 - 1992

N2 - The mechanism by which the fluorinated quinolones produce central nervous system (CNS) effects is currently unknown. We measured the effect of lomefloxacin on cerebral blood flow and metabolism using positron emission tomography. Eighteen healthy, nonsmoking volunteers were randomized to receive lomefloxacin 400 mg, ciprofloxacin 750 mg, or placebo given in a single-blind fashion every 12 hours for 72 hours, the time window for maximum lomefloxacin CNS effects. Subjects receiving lomefloxacin had a mean (± SEM) cerebral blood flow (CBF) of 46 (2.9) ml/min/100 g, glucose metabolism (FDG) 4.7 (0.4) mg/min/100 g, oxygen metabolism (OM) 3.3 (0.3) ml/min/100 g, and oxygen extraction (%OM) 0.4 (0.04). Posttreatment values were 43 (3.6) ml/min/100 g, 4.2 (0.4) mg/min/100 g, 2.6 (0.3) ml/min/100 g, and 0.4 (0.03), respectively. Values for subjects receiving ciprofloxacin were CBF 44.8 (1.6) ml/min/100 g, FDG 4.9 (0.7) mg/min/100 g, OM 4.1 (0.4) ml/min/100 g, and %OM 0.6 (0.03) at baseline, and 40.3 (3.5), 4.5 (0.6), 3.4 (0.4), and 0.5 (0.09), respectively, after treatment. For placebo-treated subjects, baseline values were CBF 41.4 (1.9) ml/min/100 g, FDG 4.9 (0.5) mg/min/100 g, OM 3.3 (0.4) ml/min/100 g, and %OM 0.5 (0.07), and respective posttreatment values were 42.1 (2.3), 5.0 (0.6), 3.5 (0.3), and 0.5 (0.02). No effect was observed on visual (qualitative), blinded reading of the scans. No significant effect on cerebral blood flow or metabolism was detected. We conclude that short-term administration of lomefloxacin or ciprofloxacin to healthy volunteers does not have a significant effect on cerebral blood flow, or on oxygen or glucose metabolism. Trends toward decreased metabolism in the quinolone-treated subjects are consistent with findings from other published trials, although their significance is unclear.

AB - The mechanism by which the fluorinated quinolones produce central nervous system (CNS) effects is currently unknown. We measured the effect of lomefloxacin on cerebral blood flow and metabolism using positron emission tomography. Eighteen healthy, nonsmoking volunteers were randomized to receive lomefloxacin 400 mg, ciprofloxacin 750 mg, or placebo given in a single-blind fashion every 12 hours for 72 hours, the time window for maximum lomefloxacin CNS effects. Subjects receiving lomefloxacin had a mean (± SEM) cerebral blood flow (CBF) of 46 (2.9) ml/min/100 g, glucose metabolism (FDG) 4.7 (0.4) mg/min/100 g, oxygen metabolism (OM) 3.3 (0.3) ml/min/100 g, and oxygen extraction (%OM) 0.4 (0.04). Posttreatment values were 43 (3.6) ml/min/100 g, 4.2 (0.4) mg/min/100 g, 2.6 (0.3) ml/min/100 g, and 0.4 (0.03), respectively. Values for subjects receiving ciprofloxacin were CBF 44.8 (1.6) ml/min/100 g, FDG 4.9 (0.7) mg/min/100 g, OM 4.1 (0.4) ml/min/100 g, and %OM 0.6 (0.03) at baseline, and 40.3 (3.5), 4.5 (0.6), 3.4 (0.4), and 0.5 (0.09), respectively, after treatment. For placebo-treated subjects, baseline values were CBF 41.4 (1.9) ml/min/100 g, FDG 4.9 (0.5) mg/min/100 g, OM 3.3 (0.4) ml/min/100 g, and %OM 0.5 (0.07), and respective posttreatment values were 42.1 (2.3), 5.0 (0.6), 3.5 (0.3), and 0.5 (0.02). No effect was observed on visual (qualitative), blinded reading of the scans. No significant effect on cerebral blood flow or metabolism was detected. We conclude that short-term administration of lomefloxacin or ciprofloxacin to healthy volunteers does not have a significant effect on cerebral blood flow, or on oxygen or glucose metabolism. Trends toward decreased metabolism in the quinolone-treated subjects are consistent with findings from other published trials, although their significance is unclear.

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