Comparative analysis of survivin expression in untreated and relapsed canine lymphoma

Robert B Rebhun, S. E. Lana, E. J. Ehrhart, J. B. Charles, D. H. Thamm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, has a dual role in tumor cell proliferative and antiapoptotic pathways. Survivin expression has been shown to be a negative prognostic factor in several cancers of humans, including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Hypotheses: High survivin expression will be a negative prognostic factor in dogs with lymphoma (LSA) treated with chemotherapy. In addition, survivin expression will be upregulated in relapsed canine LSA when compared with patient-matched, pretreatment biopsies. Animals: Thirty-one client-owned dogs with stage IIIa or IVa LSA. Methods: Retrospective evaluation of survivin immunoreactivity was performed on pretreatment lymph node biopsies and patient-matched samples obtained from dogs at relapse after being treated with an abbreviated CHOP-based protocol. Results: In this population of dogs presenting with stage IIIa or IVa B-cell LSA, those dogs that had high survivin immunoreactivity scores had a significantly (P < .01, hazard ratio = 0.30) shorter median disease-free interval than did dogs with low survivin immunoreactivity scores (171 days versus 321 days, respectively). Survivin immunoreactivity was not significantly different in relapsed canine LSA when compared with patient-matched, pretreatment biopsies. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Survivin expression is a negative prognostic factor that can predict early treatment failure of dogs that present with stage IIIa or IVa, B-cell LSA when treated with a CHOP-based protocol.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)989-995
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Dogs
  • IAP
  • Lymphosarcoma
  • Prognosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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