Commentary: Developmental stages of forensic psychiatry fellowship training - From theoretical underpinnings to assessment outcomes

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dr. Pinals' paper provides an excellent foundation for studying the developmental process of forensic psychiatry fellows during their training year. She proposes three stages: (1) transformation, (2) growth of confidence and adaptation, and (3) identification and realization. This commentary compares Dr. Pinals' proposed developmental stages to Margaret Mahler's theory of infant development and to Dr. Lev Vygotsky's social learning theory. Assessment methods to evaluate core competencies suggested by the American Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) are reviewed. A potential survey of forensic psychiatry fellowship program directors to validate Dr. Pinals' proposed developmental model is described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)328-334
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
Volume33
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2005

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Forensic Psychiatry
psychiatry
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
infant development
Graduate Medical Education
social learning
learning theory
Child Development
director
confidence
graduate
Medicine
Growth
education
Social Learning
Surveys and Questionnaires
Social Theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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