Combinatorial, microparticle-based delivery of immune modulators reprograms dendritic cell phenotype and promotes remission of collagen-induced arthritis in mice

Riley Allen, Shawn Chizari, Luke McKibbin, Siba P Raychaudhuri, Jamal S. Lewis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Statement of Purpose: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, disabling autoimmune condition afflicting about 0.3 – 1% of the world’s adult population[1]. One potential avenue for treatment of RA is the development of RA-specific tolerogenic dendritic cells (tDCs). Tolerogenic DCs (tDCs) are an attractive solution for treatment of RA in that they target the immune cascade responsible for RA, rather than addressing the symptoms as with most convention therapies. Previously, it has been demonstrated that exogenously-treated tDCs can limit autoimmunity in a RA murine model[2]. However, ex-vivo stability and manufacturing cost inhibit the widespread use of exogenously-treated tDCs in autoimmune treatments. In an effort to circumvent drawbacks with exogenously-derived tDC therapy, an “anti-vaccine" (Avac) delivering tolerogenic factors via poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles (MPs) that passively target DCs has been explored as a potential system for autoimmune disease treatment[3]. Our working hypothesis is that this Avac will modulate DC phenotype in vivo, thereby modulate downstream T and B cell responses, ultimately suppressing autoimmunity in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) murine model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSociety for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019
Subtitle of host publicationThe Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting
PublisherSociety for Biomaterials
Number of pages1
ISBN (Electronic)9781510883901
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Event42nd Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Seattle, United States
Duration: Apr 3 2019Apr 6 2019

Publication series

NameTransactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium
Volume40
ISSN (Print)1526-7547

Conference

Conference42nd Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period4/3/194/6/19

Fingerprint

Experimental Arthritis
Collagen
Dendritic Cells
Modulators
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Vaccines
Phenotype
Autoimmunity
Cells
Therapeutics
Active Immunotherapy
Acids
Autoimmune Diseases
Costs
B-Lymphocytes
T-Lymphocytes
Costs and Cost Analysis
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Biotechnology
  • Biomaterials
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Allen, R., Chizari, S., McKibbin, L., Raychaudhuri, S. P., & Lewis, J. S. (2019). Combinatorial, microparticle-based delivery of immune modulators reprograms dendritic cell phenotype and promotes remission of collagen-induced arthritis in mice. In Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting (Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium; Vol. 40). Society for Biomaterials. https://doi.org/10.1021/acsabm.9b00092

Combinatorial, microparticle-based delivery of immune modulators reprograms dendritic cell phenotype and promotes remission of collagen-induced arthritis in mice. / Allen, Riley; Chizari, Shawn; McKibbin, Luke; Raychaudhuri, Siba P; Lewis, Jamal S.

Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting. Society for Biomaterials, 2019. (Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium; Vol. 40).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Allen, R, Chizari, S, McKibbin, L, Raychaudhuri, SP & Lewis, JS 2019, Combinatorial, microparticle-based delivery of immune modulators reprograms dendritic cell phenotype and promotes remission of collagen-induced arthritis in mice. in Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting. Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium, vol. 40, Society for Biomaterials, 42nd Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence, Seattle, United States, 4/3/19. https://doi.org/10.1021/acsabm.9b00092
Allen R, Chizari S, McKibbin L, Raychaudhuri SP, Lewis JS. Combinatorial, microparticle-based delivery of immune modulators reprograms dendritic cell phenotype and promotes remission of collagen-induced arthritis in mice. In Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting. Society for Biomaterials. 2019. (Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium). https://doi.org/10.1021/acsabm.9b00092
Allen, Riley ; Chizari, Shawn ; McKibbin, Luke ; Raychaudhuri, Siba P ; Lewis, Jamal S. / Combinatorial, microparticle-based delivery of immune modulators reprograms dendritic cell phenotype and promotes remission of collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting. Society for Biomaterials, 2019. (Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium).
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