Colorectal cancer screening rates increased after exposure to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH)

Beverly B. Green, Melissa L. Anderson, Jessica Chubak, Laura Mae Baldwin, Leah Tuzzio, Sheryl L Catz, Alison Cole, Sally W. Vernon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) includes comprehensive chronic illness and preventive services, including identifying patients who are overdue for colorectal cancer screening (CRCS). The association between PCMH implementation and CRCS during the Systems of Support to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Trial (SOS) is described. Methods: The SOS enrolled 4664 patients from 21 clinics from August 2008 to November 2009. Patients were randomized to usual care, mailed fecal kits, kits plus brief assistance, or kits plus assistance and navigation. A PCMH model that included a workflow for facilitating CRCS was implemented at all study clinics in late 2009. Patients enrolled early had little exposure to the PCMH, whereas patients enrolled later were exposed during most of their first year in the trial. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association between PCMH exposure and CRCS. Results: Usual care patients with ≥8 months in the PCMH had higher CRCS rates than those with ≤4 months in the PCMH (adjusted difference, 10.1%; 95% confidence interval, 5.7-14.6). SOS interventions led to significant increases in CRCS, but the magnitude of effect was attenuated by exposure to the PCMH (P for interaction =.01). Conclusion: Exposure to a PCMH was associated with higher CRCS rates. Automated mailed and centrally delivered stepped interventions increased CRCS rates, even in the presence of a PCMH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-200
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Cancer screening
  • Colon cancer
  • Medical home

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Family Practice

Cite this