Colopexy of the Left Large Colon to the Right Large Colon in the Horse

MARK D. MARKEL, TROY S. FORD, Dennis Meagher

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Abstract

Three colopexy techniques were examined in 11 normal horses to determine which would prevent recurrence of targe colon displacement and volvulus. The medial free band of the left ventral colon was sutured to the medial free band of the right ventral colon (technique A). The free band of the left dorsal colon was sutured to the free band of the right dorsal colon (technique B). In technique C, both the ventral and dorsal colon were sutured as in techniques A and B, and the pelvic flexure was sutured to the mesocolon between the right dorsal and right ventral colon. Absorbable (surgical gut) and nonabsorbable (polypropylene) suture material were compared. One horse from each group was euthanized 2 weeks and 6 months after surgery. The position of the colon and the integrity of the colopexy were examined. At necropsy, attempts were made to produce displacement and volvulus of the colon. In the remaining horses, exploratory celiotomy 1 year after surgery was used to examine the integrity of the colopexy. Although all horses initially lost weight after surgery, all but one began gaining weight 2 to 4 weeks later and had attained their preoperative weight by 6 months. The horse that continued to lose weight was euthanized 2 months after surgery. Numerous small colon, omental, and large colon adhesions were found at necropsy. For all colopexy techniques, the colopexy adhesion remained short and intact at polypropylene suture sites. At surgical gut sites, the adhesion had lengthened by 6 months and was absent at 1 year. At necropsy, all colopexies prevented manual displacement of the large colon and volvulus of the colon at the sternal and diaphragmatic flexures. The colopexies did not prevent manual creation of volvulus at the base of the colon. Technique A was the easiest to perform.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)407-413
Number of pages7
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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