Collaboration between the hemispheres of a callosotomy patient. Emerging right hemisphere speech and the left hemisphere interpreter

Michael S. Gazzaniga, James C. Eliassen, Laura Nisenson, C. Mark Wessinger, Robert Fendrich, Kathleen Baynes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Split brain patients who are initially unable to produce speech in their right hemispheres sometimes develop the ability to do so. Patient J.W., the subject of this report is such a patient. At the time of his callosotomy, J.W. had a language dominant left hemisphere; his right hemisphere could understand both spoken and written language, but he was unable to speak. Fourteen years after his surgery we found that J.W. was capable of naming ~25% of the stimuli presented to his left visual field (LVF). Now, 1 year later, we find that he can name about 60% of such stimuli. This late-developing speech ability appears to be the consequence of long-term neural plasticity. However, the subject's extended verbal responses to LVF stimuli seem to result from a collaboration between the hemispheres and to involve the left hemisphere interpreter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1255-1262
Number of pages8
JournalBrain
Volume119
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 1996

Fingerprint

Aptitude
Visual Fields
Language
Split-Brain Procedure
Neuronal Plasticity
Names
Stimulus
Right Hemisphere
Hemisphere
Left Hemisphere
Interpreter
Visual Field
Naming
Dominant Language
Neural Plasticity
Written Language
Split
Spoken Language
Surgery

Keywords

  • Interpreter
  • Right hemisphere speech
  • Split brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Gazzaniga, M. S., Eliassen, J. C., Nisenson, L., Wessinger, C. M., Fendrich, R., & Baynes, K. (1996). Collaboration between the hemispheres of a callosotomy patient. Emerging right hemisphere speech and the left hemisphere interpreter. Brain, 119(4), 1255-1262.

Collaboration between the hemispheres of a callosotomy patient. Emerging right hemisphere speech and the left hemisphere interpreter. / Gazzaniga, Michael S.; Eliassen, James C.; Nisenson, Laura; Wessinger, C. Mark; Fendrich, Robert; Baynes, Kathleen.

In: Brain, Vol. 119, No. 4, 08.1996, p. 1255-1262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gazzaniga, MS, Eliassen, JC, Nisenson, L, Wessinger, CM, Fendrich, R & Baynes, K 1996, 'Collaboration between the hemispheres of a callosotomy patient. Emerging right hemisphere speech and the left hemisphere interpreter', Brain, vol. 119, no. 4, pp. 1255-1262.
Gazzaniga, Michael S. ; Eliassen, James C. ; Nisenson, Laura ; Wessinger, C. Mark ; Fendrich, Robert ; Baynes, Kathleen. / Collaboration between the hemispheres of a callosotomy patient. Emerging right hemisphere speech and the left hemisphere interpreter. In: Brain. 1996 ; Vol. 119, No. 4. pp. 1255-1262.
@article{6512713823eb4c7eb7836b18f47074f5,
title = "Collaboration between the hemispheres of a callosotomy patient. Emerging right hemisphere speech and the left hemisphere interpreter",
abstract = "Split brain patients who are initially unable to produce speech in their right hemispheres sometimes develop the ability to do so. Patient J.W., the subject of this report is such a patient. At the time of his callosotomy, J.W. had a language dominant left hemisphere; his right hemisphere could understand both spoken and written language, but he was unable to speak. Fourteen years after his surgery we found that J.W. was capable of naming ~25{\%} of the stimuli presented to his left visual field (LVF). Now, 1 year later, we find that he can name about 60{\%} of such stimuli. This late-developing speech ability appears to be the consequence of long-term neural plasticity. However, the subject's extended verbal responses to LVF stimuli seem to result from a collaboration between the hemispheres and to involve the left hemisphere interpreter.",
keywords = "Interpreter, Right hemisphere speech, Split brain",
author = "Gazzaniga, {Michael S.} and Eliassen, {James C.} and Laura Nisenson and Wessinger, {C. Mark} and Robert Fendrich and Kathleen Baynes",
year = "1996",
month = "8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "119",
pages = "1255--1262",
journal = "Brain",
issn = "0006-8950",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Collaboration between the hemispheres of a callosotomy patient. Emerging right hemisphere speech and the left hemisphere interpreter

AU - Gazzaniga, Michael S.

AU - Eliassen, James C.

AU - Nisenson, Laura

AU - Wessinger, C. Mark

AU - Fendrich, Robert

AU - Baynes, Kathleen

PY - 1996/8

Y1 - 1996/8

N2 - Split brain patients who are initially unable to produce speech in their right hemispheres sometimes develop the ability to do so. Patient J.W., the subject of this report is such a patient. At the time of his callosotomy, J.W. had a language dominant left hemisphere; his right hemisphere could understand both spoken and written language, but he was unable to speak. Fourteen years after his surgery we found that J.W. was capable of naming ~25% of the stimuli presented to his left visual field (LVF). Now, 1 year later, we find that he can name about 60% of such stimuli. This late-developing speech ability appears to be the consequence of long-term neural plasticity. However, the subject's extended verbal responses to LVF stimuli seem to result from a collaboration between the hemispheres and to involve the left hemisphere interpreter.

AB - Split brain patients who are initially unable to produce speech in their right hemispheres sometimes develop the ability to do so. Patient J.W., the subject of this report is such a patient. At the time of his callosotomy, J.W. had a language dominant left hemisphere; his right hemisphere could understand both spoken and written language, but he was unable to speak. Fourteen years after his surgery we found that J.W. was capable of naming ~25% of the stimuli presented to his left visual field (LVF). Now, 1 year later, we find that he can name about 60% of such stimuli. This late-developing speech ability appears to be the consequence of long-term neural plasticity. However, the subject's extended verbal responses to LVF stimuli seem to result from a collaboration between the hemispheres and to involve the left hemisphere interpreter.

KW - Interpreter

KW - Right hemisphere speech

KW - Split brain

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029741994&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029741994&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8813288

AN - SCOPUS:0029741994

VL - 119

SP - 1255

EP - 1262

JO - Brain

JF - Brain

SN - 0006-8950

IS - 4

ER -