Cognitive reappraisal self-efficacy mediates the effects of individual cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder

Philip R Goldin, Michal Ziv, Hooria Jazaieri, Kelly Werner, Helena Kraemer, Richard G. Heimberg, James J. Gross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine whether changes in cognitive reappraisal self-efficacy (CR-SE) mediate the effects of individually administered cognitive-behavioral therapy (I-CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) on severity of social anxiety symptoms. Method: A randomized controlled trial in which 75 adult patients (21-55 years of age; 53% male; 57% Caucasian) with a principal diagnosis of generalized SAD were randomly assigned to 16 sessions of I-CBT (n = 38) or a wait-list control (WL) group (n = 37). All patients completed self-report inventories measuring CR-SE and social anxiety symptoms at baseline and post-I-CBT/post-WL, and I-CBT completers were also assessed at 1-year posttreatment. Results: Compared with WL, I-CBT resulted in greater increases in CR-SE and greater decreases in social anxiety. Increases in CR-SE during I-CBT mediated the effect of I-CBT on social anxiety. Gains achieved by patients receiving I-CBT were maintained 1-year posttreatment, and I-CBT-related increases in CR-SE were also associated with reduction in social anxiety at the 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: Increasing CR-SE may be an important mechanism by which I-CBT for SAD produces both immediate and long-term reductions in social anxiety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1034-1040
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume80
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Cognitive Therapy
Self Efficacy
Anxiety
Social Phobia
Self-efficacy
Anxiety Disorders
Therapy
Self Report
Randomized Controlled Trials
Equipment and Supplies
Control Groups

Keywords

  • cognitive reappraisal
  • cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • emotion regulation
  • self-efficacy
  • social anxiety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cognitive reappraisal self-efficacy mediates the effects of individual cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder. / Goldin, Philip R; Ziv, Michal; Jazaieri, Hooria; Werner, Kelly; Kraemer, Helena; Heimberg, Richard G.; Gross, James J.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 80, No. 6, 2012, p. 1034-1040.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldin, Philip R ; Ziv, Michal ; Jazaieri, Hooria ; Werner, Kelly ; Kraemer, Helena ; Heimberg, Richard G. ; Gross, James J. / Cognitive reappraisal self-efficacy mediates the effects of individual cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 80, No. 6. pp. 1034-1040.
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