Cognition and Amatomy in Three Variants of Primany Progressive Aphasia

Maria Luisa Gorno-Tempini, Nina Dronkers, Katherine P. Rankin, Jennifer M. Ogar, La Phengrasamy, Howard J. Rosen, Julene K. Johnson, Michael W. Weiner, Bruce L. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We performed a comprehensive cognitive, neuroimaging, and genetic study of 31 patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), a decline in language functions that remains isolated for at least 2 years. Detailed speech and language evaluation was used to identify three different clinical variants: nonfluent progressive aphasia (NFPA; n = 11), semantic dementia (SD; n = 10), and a third variant termed logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA; n = 10). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) on MRIs showed that, when all 31 PPA patients were analyzed together, the left perisylvian region and the anterior temporal lobes were atrophied. However, when each clinical variant was considered separately, distinctive patterns emerged: (1) NFPA, characterized by apraxia of speech and deficits in processing complex syntax, was associated with left inferior frontal and insular atrophy; (2) SD, characterized by fluent speech and semantic memory deficits, was associated with anterior temporal damage; and (3) LPA, characterized by slow speech and impaired syntactic comprehension and naming, showed atrophy in the left posterior temporal cortex and inferior parietal lobule. Apolipoprotein E ε4 haplotype frequency was 20% in NFPA, 0% in SD, and 67% in LPA. Cognitive, genetic, and anatomical features indicate that different PPA clinical variants may correspond to different underlying pathological processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-346
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of Neurology
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004

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Primary Progressive Aphasia
Aphasia
Cognition
Temporal Lobe
Atrophy
Primary Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia
Language
Apolipoprotein E4
Apraxias
Frontotemporal Dementia
Parietal Lobe
Memory Disorders
Pathologic Processes
Semantics
Neuroimaging
Haplotypes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Gorno-Tempini, M. L., Dronkers, N., Rankin, K. P., Ogar, J. M., Phengrasamy, L., Rosen, H. J., ... Miller, B. L. (2004). Cognition and Amatomy in Three Variants of Primany Progressive Aphasia. Annals of Neurology, 55(3), 335-346. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.10825

Cognition and Amatomy in Three Variants of Primany Progressive Aphasia. / Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Dronkers, Nina; Rankin, Katherine P.; Ogar, Jennifer M.; Phengrasamy, La; Rosen, Howard J.; Johnson, Julene K.; Weiner, Michael W.; Miller, Bruce L.

In: Annals of Neurology, Vol. 55, No. 3, 03.2004, p. 335-346.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gorno-Tempini, ML, Dronkers, N, Rankin, KP, Ogar, JM, Phengrasamy, L, Rosen, HJ, Johnson, JK, Weiner, MW & Miller, BL 2004, 'Cognition and Amatomy in Three Variants of Primany Progressive Aphasia', Annals of Neurology, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 335-346. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.10825
Gorno-Tempini ML, Dronkers N, Rankin KP, Ogar JM, Phengrasamy L, Rosen HJ et al. Cognition and Amatomy in Three Variants of Primany Progressive Aphasia. Annals of Neurology. 2004 Mar;55(3):335-346. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.10825
Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa ; Dronkers, Nina ; Rankin, Katherine P. ; Ogar, Jennifer M. ; Phengrasamy, La ; Rosen, Howard J. ; Johnson, Julene K. ; Weiner, Michael W. ; Miller, Bruce L. / Cognition and Amatomy in Three Variants of Primany Progressive Aphasia. In: Annals of Neurology. 2004 ; Vol. 55, No. 3. pp. 335-346.
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