Coffee intake and gastric cancer risk

The Singapore Chinese health study

Cheryl E. Ainslie-Waldman, Woon Puay Koh, Aizhen Jin, Khay Guan Yeoh, Feng Zhu, Renwei Wang, Jian Min Yuan, Lesley M. Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite experimental evidence showing chemopreventive effects of coffee-related compounds on gastric carcinogenesis, epidemiologic studies generally do not support coffee-gastric cancer associations. Observational data are lacking among high-risk populations with sufficient regular coffee consumption. Methods: We examined the association between caffeinated coffee intake and gastric cancer risk in a population-based cohort that enrolled 63,257 Chinese men and women ages 45 to 74 years between 1993 and 1998 in Singapore. Incident gastric cancer cases (n = 647) were identified after a mean follow-up of 14.7 years. Biomarkers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection were measured in a subset of gastric cancer cases with blood collected before cancer diagnosis and their matched controls. Results: In the total cohort, daily versus nondaily coffee intake was associated with a statistically nonsignificant decrease in gastric cancer risk [HR = 0.85; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.69-1.04]. In women, the inverse association strengthened and reached statistical significance (HR = 0.63; 95% CI, 0.46-0.87). In analyses restricted to never smokers and nondrinkers of alcohol, inverse associations strengthened in the total cohort (HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.52-0.91) and in women (HR = 0.52; 95% CI, 0.37-0.74). There was no coffee-gastric cancer risk association among men, regardless of smoking status or alcohol consumption. Similar results were observed in the nested case-control study after adjustment for H. pylori infection. Conclusion: Daily coffee consumption may reduce the risk of gastric cancer in high-risk populations, especially among women. Impact: Research aimed at identifying the compounds in coffee that may protect against gastric carcinogenesis is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)638-647
Number of pages10
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Coffee
Singapore
Stomach Neoplasms
Health
Confidence Intervals
Helicobacter Infections
Helicobacter pylori
Stomach
Carcinogenesis
Population
Alcohol Drinking
Case-Control Studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Biomarkers
Smoking
Alcohols
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ainslie-Waldman, C. E., Koh, W. P., Jin, A., Yeoh, K. G., Zhu, F., Wang, R., ... Butler, L. M. (2014). Coffee intake and gastric cancer risk: The Singapore Chinese health study. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 23(4), 638-647. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0886

Coffee intake and gastric cancer risk : The Singapore Chinese health study. / Ainslie-Waldman, Cheryl E.; Koh, Woon Puay; Jin, Aizhen; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian Min; Butler, Lesley M.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 23, No. 4, 2014, p. 638-647.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ainslie-Waldman, CE, Koh, WP, Jin, A, Yeoh, KG, Zhu, F, Wang, R, Yuan, JM & Butler, LM 2014, 'Coffee intake and gastric cancer risk: The Singapore Chinese health study', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 638-647. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0886
Ainslie-Waldman, Cheryl E. ; Koh, Woon Puay ; Jin, Aizhen ; Yeoh, Khay Guan ; Zhu, Feng ; Wang, Renwei ; Yuan, Jian Min ; Butler, Lesley M. / Coffee intake and gastric cancer risk : The Singapore Chinese health study. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2014 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 638-647.
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abstract = "Background: Despite experimental evidence showing chemopreventive effects of coffee-related compounds on gastric carcinogenesis, epidemiologic studies generally do not support coffee-gastric cancer associations. Observational data are lacking among high-risk populations with sufficient regular coffee consumption. Methods: We examined the association between caffeinated coffee intake and gastric cancer risk in a population-based cohort that enrolled 63,257 Chinese men and women ages 45 to 74 years between 1993 and 1998 in Singapore. Incident gastric cancer cases (n = 647) were identified after a mean follow-up of 14.7 years. Biomarkers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection were measured in a subset of gastric cancer cases with blood collected before cancer diagnosis and their matched controls. Results: In the total cohort, daily versus nondaily coffee intake was associated with a statistically nonsignificant decrease in gastric cancer risk [HR = 0.85; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI), 0.69-1.04]. In women, the inverse association strengthened and reached statistical significance (HR = 0.63; 95{\%} CI, 0.46-0.87). In analyses restricted to never smokers and nondrinkers of alcohol, inverse associations strengthened in the total cohort (HR = 0.69; 95{\%} CI, 0.52-0.91) and in women (HR = 0.52; 95{\%} CI, 0.37-0.74). There was no coffee-gastric cancer risk association among men, regardless of smoking status or alcohol consumption. Similar results were observed in the nested case-control study after adjustment for H. pylori infection. Conclusion: Daily coffee consumption may reduce the risk of gastric cancer in high-risk populations, especially among women. Impact: Research aimed at identifying the compounds in coffee that may protect against gastric carcinogenesis is warranted.",
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AU - Zhu, Feng

AU - Wang, Renwei

AU - Yuan, Jian Min

AU - Butler, Lesley M.

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N2 - Background: Despite experimental evidence showing chemopreventive effects of coffee-related compounds on gastric carcinogenesis, epidemiologic studies generally do not support coffee-gastric cancer associations. Observational data are lacking among high-risk populations with sufficient regular coffee consumption. Methods: We examined the association between caffeinated coffee intake and gastric cancer risk in a population-based cohort that enrolled 63,257 Chinese men and women ages 45 to 74 years between 1993 and 1998 in Singapore. Incident gastric cancer cases (n = 647) were identified after a mean follow-up of 14.7 years. Biomarkers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection were measured in a subset of gastric cancer cases with blood collected before cancer diagnosis and their matched controls. Results: In the total cohort, daily versus nondaily coffee intake was associated with a statistically nonsignificant decrease in gastric cancer risk [HR = 0.85; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.69-1.04]. In women, the inverse association strengthened and reached statistical significance (HR = 0.63; 95% CI, 0.46-0.87). In analyses restricted to never smokers and nondrinkers of alcohol, inverse associations strengthened in the total cohort (HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.52-0.91) and in women (HR = 0.52; 95% CI, 0.37-0.74). There was no coffee-gastric cancer risk association among men, regardless of smoking status or alcohol consumption. Similar results were observed in the nested case-control study after adjustment for H. pylori infection. Conclusion: Daily coffee consumption may reduce the risk of gastric cancer in high-risk populations, especially among women. Impact: Research aimed at identifying the compounds in coffee that may protect against gastric carcinogenesis is warranted.

AB - Background: Despite experimental evidence showing chemopreventive effects of coffee-related compounds on gastric carcinogenesis, epidemiologic studies generally do not support coffee-gastric cancer associations. Observational data are lacking among high-risk populations with sufficient regular coffee consumption. Methods: We examined the association between caffeinated coffee intake and gastric cancer risk in a population-based cohort that enrolled 63,257 Chinese men and women ages 45 to 74 years between 1993 and 1998 in Singapore. Incident gastric cancer cases (n = 647) were identified after a mean follow-up of 14.7 years. Biomarkers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection were measured in a subset of gastric cancer cases with blood collected before cancer diagnosis and their matched controls. Results: In the total cohort, daily versus nondaily coffee intake was associated with a statistically nonsignificant decrease in gastric cancer risk [HR = 0.85; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.69-1.04]. In women, the inverse association strengthened and reached statistical significance (HR = 0.63; 95% CI, 0.46-0.87). In analyses restricted to never smokers and nondrinkers of alcohol, inverse associations strengthened in the total cohort (HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.52-0.91) and in women (HR = 0.52; 95% CI, 0.37-0.74). There was no coffee-gastric cancer risk association among men, regardless of smoking status or alcohol consumption. Similar results were observed in the nested case-control study after adjustment for H. pylori infection. Conclusion: Daily coffee consumption may reduce the risk of gastric cancer in high-risk populations, especially among women. Impact: Research aimed at identifying the compounds in coffee that may protect against gastric carcinogenesis is warranted.

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