Cofactors associated with Sudden Acquired Retinal Degeneration Syndrome: 151 dogs within a reference population

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine factors associated with sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) diagnosed within one referral population. Animals Studied: 151 dogs diagnosed with SARDS. Procedures: Breed, age, sex, and body weight were compared between dogs with electroretinogram-confirmed SARDS and dogs presented to the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (UCD-VMTH) from 1991 to 2014. Results: SARDS was diagnosed in 151 dogs, representing 1.3% of dogs presented to the UCD-VMTH for ophthalmic disease. Although dogs of 36 breeds were affected, the Dachshund (n = 31, 21%), Schnauzer (16, 11%), Pug (11, 7%), and Brittany (5, 3%) were significantly overrepresented, and the Labrador Retriever (3, 2%) was significantly underrepresented vs. the reference population (P < 0.001). Median (range) age and body weight of affected vs. reference dogs were 8.9 (3–20) vs. 6.8 (0.1–26) years and 12.4 (2.8–52.7) vs. 22.3 (0.1–60) kg, respectively. Dogs 6–10 years of age and between 10–20 kg in body weight were significantly overrepresented in the SARDS population, while dogs <6 years of age were significantly underrepresented (P < 0.01). Spayed females (59% of affected dogs) were significantly overrepresented compared to the reference population, whereas intact females (1% of affected dogs) were significantly underrepresented. Conclusions: Consistent with previous studies, smaller, middle-aged, spayed female dogs may be at increased risk of developing SARDS. Unlike previous studies, this is the first study comparing a variety of SARDS-affected breeds to a reference population. Potentially increased risk of SARDS in several breeds, particularly Dachshunds, suggests a familial factor that warrants further investigation using genetic techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)264-272
Number of pages9
JournalVeterinary Ophthalmology
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Retinal Degeneration
Dogs
dogs
Population
breeds
Dachshund
Body Weight
Teaching Hospitals
body weight
middle-aged adults
eye diseases
Newfoundland and Labrador
Genetic Techniques
electroretinography
Labrador Retriever
Eye Diseases
Referral and Consultation
France

Keywords

  • Brittany
  • Dachshund
  • electroretinogram
  • Pug
  • Schnauzer
  • sudden acquired retinal degeneration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

@article{d9e83fcd6c1d4170bc2ef6a4f2f32e34,
title = "Cofactors associated with Sudden Acquired Retinal Degeneration Syndrome: 151 dogs within a reference population",
abstract = "Objective: To determine factors associated with sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) diagnosed within one referral population. Animals Studied: 151 dogs diagnosed with SARDS. Procedures: Breed, age, sex, and body weight were compared between dogs with electroretinogram-confirmed SARDS and dogs presented to the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (UCD-VMTH) from 1991 to 2014. Results: SARDS was diagnosed in 151 dogs, representing 1.3{\%} of dogs presented to the UCD-VMTH for ophthalmic disease. Although dogs of 36 breeds were affected, the Dachshund (n = 31, 21{\%}), Schnauzer (16, 11{\%}), Pug (11, 7{\%}), and Brittany (5, 3{\%}) were significantly overrepresented, and the Labrador Retriever (3, 2{\%}) was significantly underrepresented vs. the reference population (P < 0.001). Median (range) age and body weight of affected vs. reference dogs were 8.9 (3–20) vs. 6.8 (0.1–26) years and 12.4 (2.8–52.7) vs. 22.3 (0.1–60) kg, respectively. Dogs 6–10 years of age and between 10–20 kg in body weight were significantly overrepresented in the SARDS population, while dogs <6 years of age were significantly underrepresented (P < 0.01). Spayed females (59{\%} of affected dogs) were significantly overrepresented compared to the reference population, whereas intact females (1{\%} of affected dogs) were significantly underrepresented. Conclusions: Consistent with previous studies, smaller, middle-aged, spayed female dogs may be at increased risk of developing SARDS. Unlike previous studies, this is the first study comparing a variety of SARDS-affected breeds to a reference population. Potentially increased risk of SARDS in several breeds, particularly Dachshunds, suggests a familial factor that warrants further investigation using genetic techniques.",
keywords = "Brittany, Dachshund, electroretinogram, Pug, Schnauzer, sudden acquired retinal degeneration",
author = "Auten, {Candace R.} and Thomasy, {Sara M} and Kass, {Philip H} and Koehler, {Kathryn G} and Hollingsworth, {Steven R} and Maggs, {David J}",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/vop.12504",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "264--272",
journal = "Veterinary Ophthalmology",
issn = "1463-5216",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cofactors associated with Sudden Acquired Retinal Degeneration Syndrome

T2 - 151 dogs within a reference population

AU - Auten, Candace R.

AU - Thomasy, Sara M

AU - Kass, Philip H

AU - Koehler, Kathryn G

AU - Hollingsworth, Steven R

AU - Maggs, David J

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - Objective: To determine factors associated with sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) diagnosed within one referral population. Animals Studied: 151 dogs diagnosed with SARDS. Procedures: Breed, age, sex, and body weight were compared between dogs with electroretinogram-confirmed SARDS and dogs presented to the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (UCD-VMTH) from 1991 to 2014. Results: SARDS was diagnosed in 151 dogs, representing 1.3% of dogs presented to the UCD-VMTH for ophthalmic disease. Although dogs of 36 breeds were affected, the Dachshund (n = 31, 21%), Schnauzer (16, 11%), Pug (11, 7%), and Brittany (5, 3%) were significantly overrepresented, and the Labrador Retriever (3, 2%) was significantly underrepresented vs. the reference population (P < 0.001). Median (range) age and body weight of affected vs. reference dogs were 8.9 (3–20) vs. 6.8 (0.1–26) years and 12.4 (2.8–52.7) vs. 22.3 (0.1–60) kg, respectively. Dogs 6–10 years of age and between 10–20 kg in body weight were significantly overrepresented in the SARDS population, while dogs <6 years of age were significantly underrepresented (P < 0.01). Spayed females (59% of affected dogs) were significantly overrepresented compared to the reference population, whereas intact females (1% of affected dogs) were significantly underrepresented. Conclusions: Consistent with previous studies, smaller, middle-aged, spayed female dogs may be at increased risk of developing SARDS. Unlike previous studies, this is the first study comparing a variety of SARDS-affected breeds to a reference population. Potentially increased risk of SARDS in several breeds, particularly Dachshunds, suggests a familial factor that warrants further investigation using genetic techniques.

AB - Objective: To determine factors associated with sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) diagnosed within one referral population. Animals Studied: 151 dogs diagnosed with SARDS. Procedures: Breed, age, sex, and body weight were compared between dogs with electroretinogram-confirmed SARDS and dogs presented to the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (UCD-VMTH) from 1991 to 2014. Results: SARDS was diagnosed in 151 dogs, representing 1.3% of dogs presented to the UCD-VMTH for ophthalmic disease. Although dogs of 36 breeds were affected, the Dachshund (n = 31, 21%), Schnauzer (16, 11%), Pug (11, 7%), and Brittany (5, 3%) were significantly overrepresented, and the Labrador Retriever (3, 2%) was significantly underrepresented vs. the reference population (P < 0.001). Median (range) age and body weight of affected vs. reference dogs were 8.9 (3–20) vs. 6.8 (0.1–26) years and 12.4 (2.8–52.7) vs. 22.3 (0.1–60) kg, respectively. Dogs 6–10 years of age and between 10–20 kg in body weight were significantly overrepresented in the SARDS population, while dogs <6 years of age were significantly underrepresented (P < 0.01). Spayed females (59% of affected dogs) were significantly overrepresented compared to the reference population, whereas intact females (1% of affected dogs) were significantly underrepresented. Conclusions: Consistent with previous studies, smaller, middle-aged, spayed female dogs may be at increased risk of developing SARDS. Unlike previous studies, this is the first study comparing a variety of SARDS-affected breeds to a reference population. Potentially increased risk of SARDS in several breeds, particularly Dachshunds, suggests a familial factor that warrants further investigation using genetic techniques.

KW - Brittany

KW - Dachshund

KW - electroretinogram

KW - Pug

KW - Schnauzer

KW - sudden acquired retinal degeneration

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85046748870&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85046748870&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/vop.12504

DO - 10.1111/vop.12504

M3 - Article

C2 - 28845542

AN - SCOPUS:85046748870

VL - 21

SP - 264

EP - 272

JO - Veterinary Ophthalmology

JF - Veterinary Ophthalmology

SN - 1463-5216

IS - 3

ER -