Coccidioidomycosis in Northern California: an outbreak among archeology students near Red Bluff

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

An outbreak of coccidioidomycosis occurred among 39 archeology students in the summer of 1972. The students excavated Indian ruins near Red Bluff in Tehama County, California, 20 miles north of the previously recognized northernmost limit of endemicity. At least 17 persons contracted the illness. Coccidioidomycosis was documented by skin test conversion as well as by specific serologic reactions (precipitins, cft). C. immitis was also isolated from two soil samples taken at the excavation site. In the light of its ecological requirements, it is doubtful that C. immitis will be recovered much farther north than Red Bluff. The occupational hazard of coccidioidomycosis to archeologists and others employed in known endemic areas remains a substantial threat to health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCALIF.MED.
Pages16-20
Number of pages5
Volume119
Edition3
StatePublished - 1973

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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