Coccidioidomycosis

Epidemiology

Jennifer Brown, Kaitlin Benedict, Benjamin J. Park, George Richard Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coccidioidomycosis consists of a spectrum of disease, ranging from a mild, self-limited, febrile illness to severe, life-threatening infection. It is caused by the soil-dwelling fungi, Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii, which are present in diverse endemic areas. Climate changes and environmental factors affect the Coccidioides lifecycle and influence infection rates. The incidence of coccidioidomycosis has risen substantially over the past two decades. The vast majority of Coccidioides infections occur in the endemic zones, such as California, Arizona, Mexico, and Central America. Infections occurring outside those zones appear to be increasingly common, and pose unique clinical and public health challenges. It has long been known that elderly persons, pregnant women, and members of certain ethnic groups are at risk for severe or disseminated coccidioidomycosis. In recent years, it has become evident that persons with immunodeficiency diseases, diabetics, transplant recipients, and prisoners are also particularly vulnerable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-197
Number of pages13
JournalClinical Epidemiology
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 24 2013

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Coccidioidomycosis
Coccidioides
Epidemiology
Infection
Central America
Prisoners
Climate Change
Mexico
Ethnic Groups
Pregnant Women
Fungi
Fever
Soil
Public Health
Incidence

Keywords

  • Coccidioides
  • Coccidioidomycosis
  • Epidemiology
  • Geography
  • Incidence
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Coccidioidomycosis : Epidemiology. / Brown, Jennifer; Benedict, Kaitlin; Park, Benjamin J.; Thompson, George Richard.

In: Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 5, No. 1, 24.06.2013, p. 185-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, Jennifer ; Benedict, Kaitlin ; Park, Benjamin J. ; Thompson, George Richard. / Coccidioidomycosis : Epidemiology. In: Clinical Epidemiology. 2013 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 185-197.
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