Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age

Rebecca J. Baker, Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Miroslav Dostál, Jean A. Keller, Jiři Nožička, František Kotěšovec, Jan Dejmek, Dana Loomis, Radim J. Šrám

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate how indoor pollution from tobacco and home heating may adversely affect respiratory health in young children. Design: A birth cohort was followed longitudinally for 3 years to determine incidence of lower respiratory illness (LRI). Participants: A total of 452 children born 1994-1996 in two districts in the Czech Republic participated. Evaluations: Indoor combustion exposures were home heating and cooking fuel, mother's smoking during pregnancy, and other adult smokers in the household. Diagnoses of LRI (primarily acute bronchitis) from birth to 3 years of age were abstracted from pediatric records. Questionnaires completed at delivery and at 3-year follow-up provided covariate information. LRI incidence rates were modeled with generalized linear models adjusting for repeated measures and for numerous potential confounders. Results: LRI diagnoses occurred more frequently in children from homes heated by coal [vs. other energy sources or distant furnaces; rate ratio (RR) = 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.97]. Maternal prenatal smoking and other adult smokers also increased LRI rates (respectively: RR = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.10-2.01; and RR = 1.29; 95% CI, 1.01-1.65). Cooking fuels (primarily electricity, natural gas, or propane) were not associated with LRI incidence. For children never breast-fed, coal home heating and mother's smoking conferred substantially greater risks: RR = 2.77 (95% CI, 1.45-5.27) and RR = 2.52 (95% CI, 1.31-4.85), respectively. Conclusions: Maternal smoking and coal home heating increased risk for LRI in the first 3 years of life, particularly in children not breast-fed. Relevance: Few studies have described effects of coal heating fuel on children's health in a Western country. Breast-feeding may attenuate adverse effects of prenatal and childhood exposures to combustion products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1126-1132
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume114
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006

Fingerprint

Tobacco
Coal
Smoke
Heating
Parturition
Confidence Intervals
coal
heating
confidence interval
Smoking
Mothers
smoking
Cooking
Incidence
Breast
Health
Natural Gas
Propane
Electricity
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Breast-feeding
  • Bronchitis
  • Childrens health
  • Coal heating
  • Environmental tobacco smoke
  • Indoor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age. / Baker, Rebecca J.; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Dostál, Miroslav; Keller, Jean A.; Nožička, Jiři; Kotěšovec, František; Dejmek, Jan; Loomis, Dana; Šrám, Radim J.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 114, No. 7, 07.2006, p. 1126-1132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baker, Rebecca J. ; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva ; Dostál, Miroslav ; Keller, Jean A. ; Nožička, Jiři ; Kotěšovec, František ; Dejmek, Jan ; Loomis, Dana ; Šrám, Radim J. / Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age. In: Environmental Health Perspectives. 2006 ; Vol. 114, No. 7. pp. 1126-1132.
@article{774cd5557d104092881fae4d45fbc433,
title = "Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age",
abstract = "Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate how indoor pollution from tobacco and home heating may adversely affect respiratory health in young children. Design: A birth cohort was followed longitudinally for 3 years to determine incidence of lower respiratory illness (LRI). Participants: A total of 452 children born 1994-1996 in two districts in the Czech Republic participated. Evaluations: Indoor combustion exposures were home heating and cooking fuel, mother's smoking during pregnancy, and other adult smokers in the household. Diagnoses of LRI (primarily acute bronchitis) from birth to 3 years of age were abstracted from pediatric records. Questionnaires completed at delivery and at 3-year follow-up provided covariate information. LRI incidence rates were modeled with generalized linear models adjusting for repeated measures and for numerous potential confounders. Results: LRI diagnoses occurred more frequently in children from homes heated by coal [vs. other energy sources or distant furnaces; rate ratio (RR) = 1.45; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.97]. Maternal prenatal smoking and other adult smokers also increased LRI rates (respectively: RR = 1.48; 95{\%} CI, 1.10-2.01; and RR = 1.29; 95{\%} CI, 1.01-1.65). Cooking fuels (primarily electricity, natural gas, or propane) were not associated with LRI incidence. For children never breast-fed, coal home heating and mother's smoking conferred substantially greater risks: RR = 2.77 (95{\%} CI, 1.45-5.27) and RR = 2.52 (95{\%} CI, 1.31-4.85), respectively. Conclusions: Maternal smoking and coal home heating increased risk for LRI in the first 3 years of life, particularly in children not breast-fed. Relevance: Few studies have described effects of coal heating fuel on children's health in a Western country. Breast-feeding may attenuate adverse effects of prenatal and childhood exposures to combustion products.",
keywords = "Air pollution, Breast-feeding, Bronchitis, Childrens health, Coal heating, Environmental tobacco smoke, Indoor",
author = "Baker, {Rebecca J.} and Irva Hertz-Picciotto and Miroslav Dost{\'a}l and Keller, {Jean A.} and Jiři Nožička and František Kotěšovec and Jan Dejmek and Dana Loomis and Šr{\'a}m, {Radim J.}",
year = "2006",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1289/ehp.8501",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "114",
pages = "1126--1132",
journal = "Environmental Health Perspectives",
issn = "0091-6765",
publisher = "Public Health Services, US Dept of Health and Human Services",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age

AU - Baker, Rebecca J.

AU - Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

AU - Dostál, Miroslav

AU - Keller, Jean A.

AU - Nožička, Jiři

AU - Kotěšovec, František

AU - Dejmek, Jan

AU - Loomis, Dana

AU - Šrám, Radim J.

PY - 2006/7

Y1 - 2006/7

N2 - Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate how indoor pollution from tobacco and home heating may adversely affect respiratory health in young children. Design: A birth cohort was followed longitudinally for 3 years to determine incidence of lower respiratory illness (LRI). Participants: A total of 452 children born 1994-1996 in two districts in the Czech Republic participated. Evaluations: Indoor combustion exposures were home heating and cooking fuel, mother's smoking during pregnancy, and other adult smokers in the household. Diagnoses of LRI (primarily acute bronchitis) from birth to 3 years of age were abstracted from pediatric records. Questionnaires completed at delivery and at 3-year follow-up provided covariate information. LRI incidence rates were modeled with generalized linear models adjusting for repeated measures and for numerous potential confounders. Results: LRI diagnoses occurred more frequently in children from homes heated by coal [vs. other energy sources or distant furnaces; rate ratio (RR) = 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.97]. Maternal prenatal smoking and other adult smokers also increased LRI rates (respectively: RR = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.10-2.01; and RR = 1.29; 95% CI, 1.01-1.65). Cooking fuels (primarily electricity, natural gas, or propane) were not associated with LRI incidence. For children never breast-fed, coal home heating and mother's smoking conferred substantially greater risks: RR = 2.77 (95% CI, 1.45-5.27) and RR = 2.52 (95% CI, 1.31-4.85), respectively. Conclusions: Maternal smoking and coal home heating increased risk for LRI in the first 3 years of life, particularly in children not breast-fed. Relevance: Few studies have described effects of coal heating fuel on children's health in a Western country. Breast-feeding may attenuate adverse effects of prenatal and childhood exposures to combustion products.

AB - Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate how indoor pollution from tobacco and home heating may adversely affect respiratory health in young children. Design: A birth cohort was followed longitudinally for 3 years to determine incidence of lower respiratory illness (LRI). Participants: A total of 452 children born 1994-1996 in two districts in the Czech Republic participated. Evaluations: Indoor combustion exposures were home heating and cooking fuel, mother's smoking during pregnancy, and other adult smokers in the household. Diagnoses of LRI (primarily acute bronchitis) from birth to 3 years of age were abstracted from pediatric records. Questionnaires completed at delivery and at 3-year follow-up provided covariate information. LRI incidence rates were modeled with generalized linear models adjusting for repeated measures and for numerous potential confounders. Results: LRI diagnoses occurred more frequently in children from homes heated by coal [vs. other energy sources or distant furnaces; rate ratio (RR) = 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.97]. Maternal prenatal smoking and other adult smokers also increased LRI rates (respectively: RR = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.10-2.01; and RR = 1.29; 95% CI, 1.01-1.65). Cooking fuels (primarily electricity, natural gas, or propane) were not associated with LRI incidence. For children never breast-fed, coal home heating and mother's smoking conferred substantially greater risks: RR = 2.77 (95% CI, 1.45-5.27) and RR = 2.52 (95% CI, 1.31-4.85), respectively. Conclusions: Maternal smoking and coal home heating increased risk for LRI in the first 3 years of life, particularly in children not breast-fed. Relevance: Few studies have described effects of coal heating fuel on children's health in a Western country. Breast-feeding may attenuate adverse effects of prenatal and childhood exposures to combustion products.

KW - Air pollution

KW - Breast-feeding

KW - Bronchitis

KW - Childrens health

KW - Coal heating

KW - Environmental tobacco smoke

KW - Indoor

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33745875344&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33745875344&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1289/ehp.8501

DO - 10.1289/ehp.8501

M3 - Article

C2 - 16835069

AN - SCOPUS:33745875344

VL - 114

SP - 1126

EP - 1132

JO - Environmental Health Perspectives

JF - Environmental Health Perspectives

SN - 0091-6765

IS - 7

ER -