Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin is absorbed from different intestinal segments of mice

D. M. Losada-Eaton, Francisco A Uzal, M. E. Fernández Miyakawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin is a potent toxin responsible for a rapidly fatal enterotoxaemia in several animal species. The pathogenesis of epsilon toxin includes toxicity to endothelial cells and neurons. Although epsilon toxin is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, the intestinal regions where the toxin is absorbed and the conditions favoring epsilon toxin absorption are unknown. The aim of this paper was to determine the toxicity of epsilon toxin absorbed from different gastrointestinal segments of mice and to evaluate the influence of the intestinal environment in the absorption of this toxin. Epsilon toxin diluted in one of several different saline solutions was surgically introduced into ligated stomach or intestinal segments of mice. Comparison of the toxicity of epsilon toxin injected in different sections of the gastrointestinal tract showed that this toxin can be absorbed from the small and the large intestine but not from the stomach of mice. The lethality of epsilon toxin was higher when this toxin was injected in the colon than in the small intestine. Low pH, and Na+ and glucose added to the saline solution increased the toxicity of epsilon toxin injected into the small intestine. This study shows that absorption of epsilon toxin can occur in any intestinal segment of mice and that the physicochemical characteristics of the intestinal content can affect the absorption of this toxin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1207-1213
Number of pages7
JournalToxicon
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008

Keywords

  • Absorption
  • Clostridium perfringens
  • Epsilon toxin
  • Intestine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

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