Clinicopathologic findings and outcome in dogs with infective endocarditis: 71 Cases (1992-2005)

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Abstract

Objectives - To evaluate clinical, laboratory, and necropsy findings in dogs with infective endocarditis (IE). Design - Retrospective case series. Animals - 71 dogs with possible or definite IE. Procedures - Medical records were reviewed for signalment, clinical features, and results of clinicopathologic testing and diagnostic imaging. Yearly incidence and the effect of variables on survival were determined by use of survival curve analysis. Results - The overall incidence of IE was 0.05%. Most affected dogs were of large breeds, and > 75% were older than 5 years. The aortic valve was affected in 36 of the 71 (51%) dogs, and the mitral valve was affected in 59%. Lameness caused by immune-mediated polyarthritis, septic arthritis, or peripheral arterial thromboembolism was observed in 53% of the dogs. Neurologic complications were diagnosed in 17 of 71 (24%) dogs. Thromboembolic disease was suspected in 31 of 71 (44%) of dogs. The mortality rate associated with IE was 56%, and median survival time was 54 days. Factors negatively associated with survival included thrombocytopenia, high serum creatinine concentration, renal complications, and thromboembolic complications. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - A diagnosis of IE should be suspected in dogs with fever, systolic or diastolic murmur, and locomotor problems. Dogs with thrombocytopenia, high serum creatinine concentration, thromboembolism, or renal complications may have a shorter survival time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1735-1747
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume228
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006

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endocarditis
Endocarditis
Dogs
dogs
thrombocytopenia
Thromboembolism
arthritis
Thrombocytopenia
creatinine
Creatinine
kidneys
Systolic Murmurs
Kidney
Heart Murmurs
incidence
Infectious Arthritis
Incidence
Diagnostic Imaging
Survival Analysis
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

@article{7b78474f61ce472db1e0478e809e3bd6,
title = "Clinicopathologic findings and outcome in dogs with infective endocarditis: 71 Cases (1992-2005)",
abstract = "Objectives - To evaluate clinical, laboratory, and necropsy findings in dogs with infective endocarditis (IE). Design - Retrospective case series. Animals - 71 dogs with possible or definite IE. Procedures - Medical records were reviewed for signalment, clinical features, and results of clinicopathologic testing and diagnostic imaging. Yearly incidence and the effect of variables on survival were determined by use of survival curve analysis. Results - The overall incidence of IE was 0.05{\%}. Most affected dogs were of large breeds, and > 75{\%} were older than 5 years. The aortic valve was affected in 36 of the 71 (51{\%}) dogs, and the mitral valve was affected in 59{\%}. Lameness caused by immune-mediated polyarthritis, septic arthritis, or peripheral arterial thromboembolism was observed in 53{\%} of the dogs. Neurologic complications were diagnosed in 17 of 71 (24{\%}) dogs. Thromboembolic disease was suspected in 31 of 71 (44{\%}) of dogs. The mortality rate associated with IE was 56{\%}, and median survival time was 54 days. Factors negatively associated with survival included thrombocytopenia, high serum creatinine concentration, renal complications, and thromboembolic complications. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - A diagnosis of IE should be suspected in dogs with fever, systolic or diastolic murmur, and locomotor problems. Dogs with thrombocytopenia, high serum creatinine concentration, thromboembolism, or renal complications may have a shorter survival time.",
author = "Sykes, {Jane E} and Kittleson, {Mark D} and Chomel, {Bruno B} and MacDonald, {Kristin A.} and Patricia Pesavento",
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AU - MacDonald, Kristin A.

AU - Pesavento, Patricia

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N2 - Objectives - To evaluate clinical, laboratory, and necropsy findings in dogs with infective endocarditis (IE). Design - Retrospective case series. Animals - 71 dogs with possible or definite IE. Procedures - Medical records were reviewed for signalment, clinical features, and results of clinicopathologic testing and diagnostic imaging. Yearly incidence and the effect of variables on survival were determined by use of survival curve analysis. Results - The overall incidence of IE was 0.05%. Most affected dogs were of large breeds, and > 75% were older than 5 years. The aortic valve was affected in 36 of the 71 (51%) dogs, and the mitral valve was affected in 59%. Lameness caused by immune-mediated polyarthritis, septic arthritis, or peripheral arterial thromboembolism was observed in 53% of the dogs. Neurologic complications were diagnosed in 17 of 71 (24%) dogs. Thromboembolic disease was suspected in 31 of 71 (44%) of dogs. The mortality rate associated with IE was 56%, and median survival time was 54 days. Factors negatively associated with survival included thrombocytopenia, high serum creatinine concentration, renal complications, and thromboembolic complications. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - A diagnosis of IE should be suspected in dogs with fever, systolic or diastolic murmur, and locomotor problems. Dogs with thrombocytopenia, high serum creatinine concentration, thromboembolism, or renal complications may have a shorter survival time.

AB - Objectives - To evaluate clinical, laboratory, and necropsy findings in dogs with infective endocarditis (IE). Design - Retrospective case series. Animals - 71 dogs with possible or definite IE. Procedures - Medical records were reviewed for signalment, clinical features, and results of clinicopathologic testing and diagnostic imaging. Yearly incidence and the effect of variables on survival were determined by use of survival curve analysis. Results - The overall incidence of IE was 0.05%. Most affected dogs were of large breeds, and > 75% were older than 5 years. The aortic valve was affected in 36 of the 71 (51%) dogs, and the mitral valve was affected in 59%. Lameness caused by immune-mediated polyarthritis, septic arthritis, or peripheral arterial thromboembolism was observed in 53% of the dogs. Neurologic complications were diagnosed in 17 of 71 (24%) dogs. Thromboembolic disease was suspected in 31 of 71 (44%) of dogs. The mortality rate associated with IE was 56%, and median survival time was 54 days. Factors negatively associated with survival included thrombocytopenia, high serum creatinine concentration, renal complications, and thromboembolic complications. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - A diagnosis of IE should be suspected in dogs with fever, systolic or diastolic murmur, and locomotor problems. Dogs with thrombocytopenia, high serum creatinine concentration, thromboembolism, or renal complications may have a shorter survival time.

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