Clinicopathologic and radiographic features and etiologic agents in cats with histologically confirmed infectious pneumomia

39 Cases (1991-2000)

Ellen S. Macdonald, Carol R. Norris, Roy B. Berghaus, Stephen M Griffey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To determine clinicopathologic and radiographic features and etiologic agents in cats that died as a result of infectious pneumonia. Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 39 cats. Procedure - Medical records of cats in which infectious pneumonia was confirmed by histologic examination of necropsy specimens were reviewed. Signalment, clinical signs, and results of a CBC, viral serologic tests, and thoracic radiography were evaluated. Infectious agents were classified as bacterial, viral, fungal, protozoal, or parasitic. Histologic features (severity, duration, anatomic location, and distribution) were analyzed. Results - Clinical signs referable to the respiratory tract were not detected in 14 of 39 (36%) cats, and results of a CBC (4/18 cats) and radiography (3/13) were unremarkable. Sixteen of 39 (41%) cats lacked clinical signs of systemic illness. Etiologic agents identified included bacteria (n = 21), viruses (11), fungi (6), protozoa (2), and parasites (1). Cats with clinical signs related to the respiratory tract (19/24 [79%) cats) were more likely to have severe histologic changes than cats without signs related to the respiratory system (6/14). Twenty-nine of 38 (76%) cats had histologic evidence of systemic disease, whereas the remaining cats had lesions limited to the respiratory tract. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Infectious pneumonia is uncommon in cats. Cats with infectious pneumonia may lack clinical signs and have unremarkable results for a CBC and thoracic radiography, yet frequently have systemic infections. Therefore, clinicians should maintain an index of suspicion for pneumonia and evaluate the respiratory tract when infection is detected in other organ systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1142-1150
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume223
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2003

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Cats
cats
pneumonia
Pneumonia
respiratory system
Respiratory System
Thoracic Radiography
radiography
chest
Serologic Tests
immunologic techniques
retrospective studies
Radiography
lesions (animal)
Respiratory Tract Infections
respiratory tract diseases
Medical Records
Protozoa
necropsy
Parasites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Clinicopathologic and radiographic features and etiologic agents in cats with histologically confirmed infectious pneumomia : 39 Cases (1991-2000). / Macdonald, Ellen S.; Norris, Carol R.; Berghaus, Roy B.; Griffey, Stephen M.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 223, No. 8, 15.10.2003, p. 1142-1150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective - To determine clinicopathologic and radiographic features and etiologic agents in cats that died as a result of infectious pneumonia. Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 39 cats. Procedure - Medical records of cats in which infectious pneumonia was confirmed by histologic examination of necropsy specimens were reviewed. Signalment, clinical signs, and results of a CBC, viral serologic tests, and thoracic radiography were evaluated. Infectious agents were classified as bacterial, viral, fungal, protozoal, or parasitic. Histologic features (severity, duration, anatomic location, and distribution) were analyzed. Results - Clinical signs referable to the respiratory tract were not detected in 14 of 39 (36{\%}) cats, and results of a CBC (4/18 cats) and radiography (3/13) were unremarkable. Sixteen of 39 (41{\%}) cats lacked clinical signs of systemic illness. Etiologic agents identified included bacteria (n = 21), viruses (11), fungi (6), protozoa (2), and parasites (1). Cats with clinical signs related to the respiratory tract (19/24 [79{\%}) cats) were more likely to have severe histologic changes than cats without signs related to the respiratory system (6/14). Twenty-nine of 38 (76{\%}) cats had histologic evidence of systemic disease, whereas the remaining cats had lesions limited to the respiratory tract. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Infectious pneumonia is uncommon in cats. Cats with infectious pneumonia may lack clinical signs and have unremarkable results for a CBC and thoracic radiography, yet frequently have systemic infections. Therefore, clinicians should maintain an index of suspicion for pneumonia and evaluate the respiratory tract when infection is detected in other organ systems.",
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