Clinically asymptomatic vascular brain injury: A potent cause of cognitive impairment among older individuals

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23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke are highly prevalent with advancing age, and stroke may be more common than Alzheimer's disease, particularly among older men. While stroke mortality continues to decline, the prevalence of individuals with various vascular risk factors continues to rise and many are undiagnosed or undertreated. Asymptomatic cerebrovascular brain injury that includes asymptomatic brain infarction and white matter hyperintensities as well as accelerated brain atrophy is even more frequent than clinical stroke. Moreover, the impact of cerebrovascular risk factors on brain injury appears to begin in middle life and additively increases the likelihood of later life dementia. This review focuses on the use of neuroimaging and genetics to understand the impact of asymptomatic vascular risk factors on the trajectories of cognitive aging as well as incident cognitive impairment, stroke, and mortality. Results of this review emphasize the need for early detection and treatment of vascular risk factors to improve the cognitive health of our rapidly aging population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume33
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Trauma
Stroke
Brain Injuries
Brain Infarction
Mortality
Neuroimaging
Atrophy
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Cognitive Dysfunction
Health
Brain
Population
vascular factor

Keywords

  • Cerebrovascular disease
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • pathophysiology
  • white matter hyperintensities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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abstract = "Cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke are highly prevalent with advancing age, and stroke may be more common than Alzheimer's disease, particularly among older men. While stroke mortality continues to decline, the prevalence of individuals with various vascular risk factors continues to rise and many are undiagnosed or undertreated. Asymptomatic cerebrovascular brain injury that includes asymptomatic brain infarction and white matter hyperintensities as well as accelerated brain atrophy is even more frequent than clinical stroke. Moreover, the impact of cerebrovascular risk factors on brain injury appears to begin in middle life and additively increases the likelihood of later life dementia. This review focuses on the use of neuroimaging and genetics to understand the impact of asymptomatic vascular risk factors on the trajectories of cognitive aging as well as incident cognitive impairment, stroke, and mortality. Results of this review emphasize the need for early detection and treatment of vascular risk factors to improve the cognitive health of our rapidly aging population.",
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