Clinical review: Update of avian influenza A infections in humans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Influenza A viruses have a wide host range for infection, from wild waterfowl to poultry to humans. Recently, the cross-species transmission of avian influenza A, particularly subtype H5N1, has highlighted the importance of the non-human subtypes and their incidence in the human population has increased over the past decade. During cross-species transmission, human disease can range from the asymptomatic to mild conjunctivitis to fulminant pneumonia and death. With these cases, however, the risk for genetic change and development of a novel virus increases, heightening the need for public health and hospital measures. This review discusses the epidemiology, host range, human disease, outcome, treatment, and prevention of cross-transmission of avian influenza A into humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number209
JournalCritical Care
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 22 2007

Fingerprint

Influenza in Birds
Infection
Host Specificity
Conjunctivitis
Public Hospitals
Influenza A virus
Poultry
Pneumonia
Epidemiology
Public Health
Viruses
Incidence
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Clinical review : Update of avian influenza A infections in humans. / Sandrock, Christian E; Kelly, Terra.

In: Critical Care, Vol. 11, No. 2, 209, 22.03.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6b6ff9ddb2a6403b9013777cfaf91c84,
title = "Clinical review: Update of avian influenza A infections in humans",
abstract = "Influenza A viruses have a wide host range for infection, from wild waterfowl to poultry to humans. Recently, the cross-species transmission of avian influenza A, particularly subtype H5N1, has highlighted the importance of the non-human subtypes and their incidence in the human population has increased over the past decade. During cross-species transmission, human disease can range from the asymptomatic to mild conjunctivitis to fulminant pneumonia and death. With these cases, however, the risk for genetic change and development of a novel virus increases, heightening the need for public health and hospital measures. This review discusses the epidemiology, host range, human disease, outcome, treatment, and prevention of cross-transmission of avian influenza A into humans.",
author = "Sandrock, {Christian E} and Terra Kelly",
year = "2007",
month = "3",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1186/cc5675",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
journal = "Critical Care",
issn = "1364-8535",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical review

T2 - Update of avian influenza A infections in humans

AU - Sandrock, Christian E

AU - Kelly, Terra

PY - 2007/3/22

Y1 - 2007/3/22

N2 - Influenza A viruses have a wide host range for infection, from wild waterfowl to poultry to humans. Recently, the cross-species transmission of avian influenza A, particularly subtype H5N1, has highlighted the importance of the non-human subtypes and their incidence in the human population has increased over the past decade. During cross-species transmission, human disease can range from the asymptomatic to mild conjunctivitis to fulminant pneumonia and death. With these cases, however, the risk for genetic change and development of a novel virus increases, heightening the need for public health and hospital measures. This review discusses the epidemiology, host range, human disease, outcome, treatment, and prevention of cross-transmission of avian influenza A into humans.

AB - Influenza A viruses have a wide host range for infection, from wild waterfowl to poultry to humans. Recently, the cross-species transmission of avian influenza A, particularly subtype H5N1, has highlighted the importance of the non-human subtypes and their incidence in the human population has increased over the past decade. During cross-species transmission, human disease can range from the asymptomatic to mild conjunctivitis to fulminant pneumonia and death. With these cases, however, the risk for genetic change and development of a novel virus increases, heightening the need for public health and hospital measures. This review discusses the epidemiology, host range, human disease, outcome, treatment, and prevention of cross-transmission of avian influenza A into humans.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=39549118698&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=39549118698&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/cc5675

DO - 10.1186/cc5675

M3 - Article

C2 - 17419881

AN - SCOPUS:39549118698

VL - 11

JO - Critical Care

JF - Critical Care

SN - 1364-8535

IS - 2

M1 - 209

ER -