Clinical recognition and management of alopecia in women of color

Jodie Raffi, Raagini Suresh, Oma Agbai

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Certain types of alopecia, such as traction alopecia, discoid lupus erythematosus, and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, occur more commonly in African-American individuals than in those of other ethnicities. Both intrinsic hair qualities and hair care practices play a role. Lower baseline tensile strength, hair density, and growth rates, as well as the use of high-tension hairstyles and chemical relaxers may contribute to alopecia in this group. Alopecia can also occur as a result of discoid lupus erythematosus, which involves chronic lymphocytic infiltration and eventual scarring of the hair follicle. Lichen planopilaris is a less common cause of scarring alopecia that can appear clinically similar to other forms of cicatricial alopecia. Lastly, although not classically associated with hair loss, recent evidence indicates that seborrheic dermatitis may play a role in shedding and alopecia. Recognizing and differentiating these alopecic subtypes clinically and histopathologically is important for prompt diagnosis and treatment. This article is based on a chapter in Ethnic Skin and Hair, and intended as a supplemental article to “Current and Emerging Treatment Strategies for Hair Loss in Women of Color.”

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Women's Dermatology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Alopecia
Color
Hair
Discoid Lupus Erythematosus
Cicatrix
Seborrheic Dermatitis
Lichens
Hair Follicle
Tensile Strength
Quality of Health Care
Traction
African Americans
Skin

Keywords

  • Alopecia
  • Discoid lupus erythematosus
  • Lichen planopilaris
  • Seborrheic dermatitis
  • Traction alopecia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Clinical recognition and management of alopecia in women of color. / Raffi, Jodie; Suresh, Raagini; Agbai, Oma.

In: International Journal of Women's Dermatology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{0dc22e3b8d0e4c5eb908cb0b4905e97c,
title = "Clinical recognition and management of alopecia in women of color",
abstract = "Certain types of alopecia, such as traction alopecia, discoid lupus erythematosus, and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, occur more commonly in African-American individuals than in those of other ethnicities. Both intrinsic hair qualities and hair care practices play a role. Lower baseline tensile strength, hair density, and growth rates, as well as the use of high-tension hairstyles and chemical relaxers may contribute to alopecia in this group. Alopecia can also occur as a result of discoid lupus erythematosus, which involves chronic lymphocytic infiltration and eventual scarring of the hair follicle. Lichen planopilaris is a less common cause of scarring alopecia that can appear clinically similar to other forms of cicatricial alopecia. Lastly, although not classically associated with hair loss, recent evidence indicates that seborrheic dermatitis may play a role in shedding and alopecia. Recognizing and differentiating these alopecic subtypes clinically and histopathologically is important for prompt diagnosis and treatment. This article is based on a chapter in Ethnic Skin and Hair, and intended as a supplemental article to “Current and Emerging Treatment Strategies for Hair Loss in Women of Color.”",
keywords = "Alopecia, Discoid lupus erythematosus, Lichen planopilaris, Seborrheic dermatitis, Traction alopecia",
author = "Jodie Raffi and Raagini Suresh and Oma Agbai",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijwd.2019.08.005",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "International Journal of Women's Dermatology",
issn = "2352-6475",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical recognition and management of alopecia in women of color

AU - Raffi, Jodie

AU - Suresh, Raagini

AU - Agbai, Oma

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Certain types of alopecia, such as traction alopecia, discoid lupus erythematosus, and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, occur more commonly in African-American individuals than in those of other ethnicities. Both intrinsic hair qualities and hair care practices play a role. Lower baseline tensile strength, hair density, and growth rates, as well as the use of high-tension hairstyles and chemical relaxers may contribute to alopecia in this group. Alopecia can also occur as a result of discoid lupus erythematosus, which involves chronic lymphocytic infiltration and eventual scarring of the hair follicle. Lichen planopilaris is a less common cause of scarring alopecia that can appear clinically similar to other forms of cicatricial alopecia. Lastly, although not classically associated with hair loss, recent evidence indicates that seborrheic dermatitis may play a role in shedding and alopecia. Recognizing and differentiating these alopecic subtypes clinically and histopathologically is important for prompt diagnosis and treatment. This article is based on a chapter in Ethnic Skin and Hair, and intended as a supplemental article to “Current and Emerging Treatment Strategies for Hair Loss in Women of Color.”

AB - Certain types of alopecia, such as traction alopecia, discoid lupus erythematosus, and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, occur more commonly in African-American individuals than in those of other ethnicities. Both intrinsic hair qualities and hair care practices play a role. Lower baseline tensile strength, hair density, and growth rates, as well as the use of high-tension hairstyles and chemical relaxers may contribute to alopecia in this group. Alopecia can also occur as a result of discoid lupus erythematosus, which involves chronic lymphocytic infiltration and eventual scarring of the hair follicle. Lichen planopilaris is a less common cause of scarring alopecia that can appear clinically similar to other forms of cicatricial alopecia. Lastly, although not classically associated with hair loss, recent evidence indicates that seborrheic dermatitis may play a role in shedding and alopecia. Recognizing and differentiating these alopecic subtypes clinically and histopathologically is important for prompt diagnosis and treatment. This article is based on a chapter in Ethnic Skin and Hair, and intended as a supplemental article to “Current and Emerging Treatment Strategies for Hair Loss in Women of Color.”

KW - Alopecia

KW - Discoid lupus erythematosus

KW - Lichen planopilaris

KW - Seborrheic dermatitis

KW - Traction alopecia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074509998&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85074509998&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijwd.2019.08.005

DO - 10.1016/j.ijwd.2019.08.005

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:85074509998

JO - International Journal of Women's Dermatology

JF - International Journal of Women's Dermatology

SN - 2352-6475

ER -