Clinical management and outcomes for goats, sheep, and pigs hospitalized for treatment of burn injuries sustained in wildfires: 28 cases (2006, 2015, and 2018)

Munashe Chigerwe, Sarah M. Depenbrock, Meera C. Heller, Ailbhe King, Suzanne A. Clergue, Celeste M. Morris, Jamie L. Peyton, John A. Angelos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To characterize injuries and describe medical management and clinical outcomes of goats, sheep, and pigs treated at a veterinary medical teaching hospital for burn injuries sustained during wildfires. ANIMALS: Goats (n = 9), sheep (12), and pigs (7) that sustained burn injuries from wildfires. PROCEDURES: Medical records were searched to identify goats, sheep, and pigs that had burn injuries associated with California wildfires in 2006, 2015, and 2018. Data regarding signalment, physical examination findings, treatments, clinical outcomes, time to discharge from the hospital, and reasons for death or euthanasia were recorded. RESULTS: The eyes, ears, nose, mouth, hooves, perineum, and ventral aspect of the abdomen were most commonly affected in both goats and sheep. In pigs, the ventral aspect of the abdomen, distal limb extremities, ears, and tail were most commonly affected. The median (range) time to discharge from the hospital for goats and pigs was 11 (3 to 90) and 85.5 (54 to 117) days, respectively. One of 9 goats, 12 of 12 sheep, and 5 of 7 pigs died or were euthanized. Laminitis and devitalization of distal limb extremities were common complications (13/28 animals) and a common reason for considering euthanasia in sheep and pigs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Burn injuries in small ruminants and pigs required prolonged treatment in some cases. Results suggested prognosis for survival may be more guarded for sheep and pigs with burn injuries than for goats; however, further research is needed to confirm these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1165-1170
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume257
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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