Clinical, hematologic, and electrolyte changes with 0.9% sodium chloride or acetated fluids in endurance horses

C. Langdon Fielding, K G Magdesian, Chloe A. Meier, Diane M. Rhodes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe the clinical and laboratory changes associated with the use of IV0.9% sodium chloride and a commercially available acetated fluid (CAF) to treat endurance horses requiring emergency medical treatment. Design: Randomized, controlled clinical trial from 2007 to 2010. Setting: Emergency treatment centers of the Western States 100-mile (220 km) endurance ride. Animals: Twelve horses requiring emergency medical treatment in the form of IVfluids completed the study. Interventions: Horses were assigned to either the 0.9% sodium chloride group (6 horses) or CAF group (6 horses) and received a total of 20 L of fluid. Clinical, hematologic, and electrolyte data were collected prior to and during fluid therapy. Measurements and Main Results: As compared to results prior to fluid therapy, horses treated with 0.9% sodium chloride had a decrease in heart rate (P < 0.01), PCV (P < 0.001), total plasma protein (TPP) (P < 0.001), and the sodium-chloride difference (P < 0.05). These horses also had an increase in plasma chloride (P < 0.01) and sodium (P < 0.01) concentrations. Horses treated with CAF showed a decrease in PCV (P < 0.01) and TPP (P < 0.001). Conclusions: These findings should aid in the design a larger clinical trial to provide further clarification on the effects of type of fluid therapy on clinical and biochemical parameters in endurance horses. The use of 0.9% sodium chloride may not be ideal for the emergency management of endurance horses as it was associated with an increase in plasma chloride concentration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-331
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Sodium Chloride
sodium chloride
Electrolytes
Horses
electrolytes
horses
fluid therapy
Emergency Treatment
Fluid Therapy
medical treatment
blood proteins
Chlorides
Blood Proteins
chlorides
fluids
randomized clinical trials
heart rate
clinical trials
Emergencies
Randomized Controlled Trials

Keywords

  • Electrolytes
  • Equine critical care
  • Fluid therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Clinical, hematologic, and electrolyte changes with 0.9% sodium chloride or acetated fluids in endurance horses. / Fielding, C. Langdon; Magdesian, K G; Meier, Chloe A.; Rhodes, Diane M.

In: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, Vol. 22, No. 3, 06.2012, p. 327-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To describe the clinical and laboratory changes associated with the use of IV0.9{\%} sodium chloride and a commercially available acetated fluid (CAF) to treat endurance horses requiring emergency medical treatment. Design: Randomized, controlled clinical trial from 2007 to 2010. Setting: Emergency treatment centers of the Western States 100-mile (220 km) endurance ride. Animals: Twelve horses requiring emergency medical treatment in the form of IVfluids completed the study. Interventions: Horses were assigned to either the 0.9{\%} sodium chloride group (6 horses) or CAF group (6 horses) and received a total of 20 L of fluid. Clinical, hematologic, and electrolyte data were collected prior to and during fluid therapy. Measurements and Main Results: As compared to results prior to fluid therapy, horses treated with 0.9{\%} sodium chloride had a decrease in heart rate (P < 0.01), PCV (P < 0.001), total plasma protein (TPP) (P < 0.001), and the sodium-chloride difference (P < 0.05). These horses also had an increase in plasma chloride (P < 0.01) and sodium (P < 0.01) concentrations. Horses treated with CAF showed a decrease in PCV (P < 0.01) and TPP (P < 0.001). Conclusions: These findings should aid in the design a larger clinical trial to provide further clarification on the effects of type of fluid therapy on clinical and biochemical parameters in endurance horses. The use of 0.9{\%} sodium chloride may not be ideal for the emergency management of endurance horses as it was associated with an increase in plasma chloride concentration.",
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