Clinical features of alcoholic hepatitis in latinos and caucasians: A single center experience

Rogelio Pinon-Gutierrez, Blythe Durbin-Johnson, Charles H. Halsted, Valentina Medici

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To study differences of presentation, management, and prognosis of alcoholic hepatitis in Latinos compared to Caucasians. Methods: We retrospectively screened 876 charts of Caucasian and Latino patients who were evaluated at University of California Davis Medical Center between 1/1/2002-12/31/2014 with the diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease. We identified and collected data on 137 Caucasians and 64 Latinos who met criteria for alcoholic hepatitis, including chronic history of heavy alcohol use, at least one episode of jaundice with bilirubin ≥ 3.0 or coagulopathy, new onset of liver decompensation or acute liver decompensation in known cirrhosis within 12 wk of last drink. Results: The mean age at presentation of alcoholic hepatitis was not significantly different between Latinos and Caucasians. There was significant lower rate of overall substance abuse in Caucasians compared to Latinos and Latinos had a higher rate of methamphetamine abuse (12.5% vs 0.7%) compared to Caucasians. Latinos had a higher mean number of hospitalizations (5.3 ± 5.6 vs 2.7 ± 2.7, P = 0.001) and mean Emergency Department visits (9.5 ± 10.8 vs 4.5 ± 4.1, P = 0.017) for alcohol related issues and complications compared to Caucasians. There was significantly higher rate of complications of portal hypertension including gastrointestinal bleeding (79.7% vs 45.3%, P < 0.001), spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (26.6% vs 9.5%, P = 0.003), and encephalopathy (81.2% vs 55.5%, P = 0.001) in Latinos compared to Caucasians. Conclusion: Latinos have significant higher rates of utilization of acute care services for manifestations alcoholic hepatitis and complications suggesting poor access to outpatient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7274-7282
Number of pages9
JournalWorld Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume23
Issue number40
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 28 2017

Fingerprint

Alcoholic Hepatitis
Hispanic Americans
Alcohols
Alcoholic Liver Diseases
Methamphetamine
Liver
Brain Diseases
Portal Hypertension
Ambulatory Care
Jaundice
Peritonitis
Bilirubin
Substance-Related Disorders
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
Fibrosis
Hemorrhage

Keywords

  • Alcoholic hepatitis
  • Alcoholic liver disease
  • Caucasian
  • Hispanic
  • Latino

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Clinical features of alcoholic hepatitis in latinos and caucasians : A single center experience. / Pinon-Gutierrez, Rogelio; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Halsted, Charles H.; Medici, Valentina.

In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 23, No. 40, 28.10.2017, p. 7274-7282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pinon-Gutierrez, Rogelio ; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe ; Halsted, Charles H. ; Medici, Valentina. / Clinical features of alcoholic hepatitis in latinos and caucasians : A single center experience. In: World Journal of Gastroenterology. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 40. pp. 7274-7282.
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abstract = "Aim: To study differences of presentation, management, and prognosis of alcoholic hepatitis in Latinos compared to Caucasians. Methods: We retrospectively screened 876 charts of Caucasian and Latino patients who were evaluated at University of California Davis Medical Center between 1/1/2002-12/31/2014 with the diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease. We identified and collected data on 137 Caucasians and 64 Latinos who met criteria for alcoholic hepatitis, including chronic history of heavy alcohol use, at least one episode of jaundice with bilirubin ≥ 3.0 or coagulopathy, new onset of liver decompensation or acute liver decompensation in known cirrhosis within 12 wk of last drink. Results: The mean age at presentation of alcoholic hepatitis was not significantly different between Latinos and Caucasians. There was significant lower rate of overall substance abuse in Caucasians compared to Latinos and Latinos had a higher rate of methamphetamine abuse (12.5{\%} vs 0.7{\%}) compared to Caucasians. Latinos had a higher mean number of hospitalizations (5.3 ± 5.6 vs 2.7 ± 2.7, P = 0.001) and mean Emergency Department visits (9.5 ± 10.8 vs 4.5 ± 4.1, P = 0.017) for alcohol related issues and complications compared to Caucasians. There was significantly higher rate of complications of portal hypertension including gastrointestinal bleeding (79.7{\%} vs 45.3{\%}, P < 0.001), spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (26.6{\%} vs 9.5{\%}, P = 0.003), and encephalopathy (81.2{\%} vs 55.5{\%}, P = 0.001) in Latinos compared to Caucasians. Conclusion: Latinos have significant higher rates of utilization of acute care services for manifestations alcoholic hepatitis and complications suggesting poor access to outpatient care.",
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N2 - Aim: To study differences of presentation, management, and prognosis of alcoholic hepatitis in Latinos compared to Caucasians. Methods: We retrospectively screened 876 charts of Caucasian and Latino patients who were evaluated at University of California Davis Medical Center between 1/1/2002-12/31/2014 with the diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease. We identified and collected data on 137 Caucasians and 64 Latinos who met criteria for alcoholic hepatitis, including chronic history of heavy alcohol use, at least one episode of jaundice with bilirubin ≥ 3.0 or coagulopathy, new onset of liver decompensation or acute liver decompensation in known cirrhosis within 12 wk of last drink. Results: The mean age at presentation of alcoholic hepatitis was not significantly different between Latinos and Caucasians. There was significant lower rate of overall substance abuse in Caucasians compared to Latinos and Latinos had a higher rate of methamphetamine abuse (12.5% vs 0.7%) compared to Caucasians. Latinos had a higher mean number of hospitalizations (5.3 ± 5.6 vs 2.7 ± 2.7, P = 0.001) and mean Emergency Department visits (9.5 ± 10.8 vs 4.5 ± 4.1, P = 0.017) for alcohol related issues and complications compared to Caucasians. There was significantly higher rate of complications of portal hypertension including gastrointestinal bleeding (79.7% vs 45.3%, P < 0.001), spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (26.6% vs 9.5%, P = 0.003), and encephalopathy (81.2% vs 55.5%, P = 0.001) in Latinos compared to Caucasians. Conclusion: Latinos have significant higher rates of utilization of acute care services for manifestations alcoholic hepatitis and complications suggesting poor access to outpatient care.

AB - Aim: To study differences of presentation, management, and prognosis of alcoholic hepatitis in Latinos compared to Caucasians. Methods: We retrospectively screened 876 charts of Caucasian and Latino patients who were evaluated at University of California Davis Medical Center between 1/1/2002-12/31/2014 with the diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease. We identified and collected data on 137 Caucasians and 64 Latinos who met criteria for alcoholic hepatitis, including chronic history of heavy alcohol use, at least one episode of jaundice with bilirubin ≥ 3.0 or coagulopathy, new onset of liver decompensation or acute liver decompensation in known cirrhosis within 12 wk of last drink. Results: The mean age at presentation of alcoholic hepatitis was not significantly different between Latinos and Caucasians. There was significant lower rate of overall substance abuse in Caucasians compared to Latinos and Latinos had a higher rate of methamphetamine abuse (12.5% vs 0.7%) compared to Caucasians. Latinos had a higher mean number of hospitalizations (5.3 ± 5.6 vs 2.7 ± 2.7, P = 0.001) and mean Emergency Department visits (9.5 ± 10.8 vs 4.5 ± 4.1, P = 0.017) for alcohol related issues and complications compared to Caucasians. There was significantly higher rate of complications of portal hypertension including gastrointestinal bleeding (79.7% vs 45.3%, P < 0.001), spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (26.6% vs 9.5%, P = 0.003), and encephalopathy (81.2% vs 55.5%, P = 0.001) in Latinos compared to Caucasians. Conclusion: Latinos have significant higher rates of utilization of acute care services for manifestations alcoholic hepatitis and complications suggesting poor access to outpatient care.

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KW - Hispanic

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