Clinical and scintigraphic findings in horses with a bone fragility disorder: 16 cases (1980-2006)

Jonathan D C Anderson, Larry D Galuppo, Bradd C. Barr, Sarah M. Puchalski, Melinda M. MacDonald, Mary B Whitcomb, K G Magdesian, Susan M Stover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To describe clinical and scintigraphic abnormalities in horses with a bone fragility disorder. Design - Retrospective case series. Animals - 16 horses with scintigraphic evidence of multiple sites of increased radiopharmaceutical uptake (IRU). Procedures - Medical records were reviewed for information on signalment; history; clinical, clinicopathologic, and diagnostic imaging findings; and treatment. Follow-up information was obtained through telephone interviews with owners. Results - Horses ranged from 4 to 22 years old; there were 8 castrated males and 8 females. Foci of IRU most commonly involved the scapulae, ribs, sternebrae, sacral tubers, ilia, and cervical vertebrae. Most horses were examined because of chronic intermittent (n = 10) or acute (6) lameness involving a single (10) or multiple (6) limbs that could not be localized by means of regional anesthesia. Cervical stiffness (n = 3), scapular bowing (3), swayback (3), and ataxia (1) were also seen in more advanced cases. Signs of respiratory tract disease and exercise intolerance were evident in 4 horses. Ultrasonographic or radiographic evidence of bone remodeling or degeneration was seen in 19 of 33 affected bones. Histologic examination of bone biopsy specimens revealed reactive bone. Improvement was initially seen with conservative treatment in some horses, but the condition worsened in all horses, and 11 horses were euthanized within 7 years. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggested that horses may develop a bone fragility disorder characterized clinically by an unrealizable lameness and scintigraphically by multiple sites of IRU involving the axial skeleton and proximal portion of the appendicular skeleton.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1694-1699
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume232
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008

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Horses
bones
horses
Bone and Bones
Radiopharmaceuticals
Skeleton
lameness
Swayback
skeleton
swayback
cervical spine
Ilium
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Cervical Vertebrae
scapula
Scapula
Conduction Anesthesia
Bone Remodeling
Ribs
Diagnostic Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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Clinical and scintigraphic findings in horses with a bone fragility disorder : 16 cases (1980-2006). / Anderson, Jonathan D C; Galuppo, Larry D; Barr, Bradd C.; Puchalski, Sarah M.; MacDonald, Melinda M.; Whitcomb, Mary B; Magdesian, K G; Stover, Susan M.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 232, No. 11, 01.06.2008, p. 1694-1699.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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