Clinical and Educational Telepsychiatry Applications: A Review

Donald M. Hilty, Shayna L. Marks, Doug Urness, Peter Mackinlay Yellowlees, Thomas S Nesbitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

149 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Telepsychiatry in the form of videoconferencing brings enormous opportunities for clinical care, education, research, and administration. Focusing on videoconferencing, we reviewed the telepsychiatry literature and compared telepsychiatry with services delivered in person or through other technologies. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive review of telepsychiatry literature from January 1, 1965, to July 31, 2003, using the terms telepsychiatry, telemedicine, videoconferencing, effectiveness, efficacy, access, outcomes, satisfaction, quality of care, education, empowerment, and costs. We selected studies for review if they discussed videoconferencing for clinical and educational applications. Results: Telepsychiatry is successfully used for various clinical services and educational initiatives. Telepsychiatry is feasible, increases access to care, enables specialty consultation, yields positive outcomes, allows reliable evaluation, has few negative aspects in terms of communication, generally satisfies patients and providers, facilitates education, and empowers parties using it. Data are limited with regard to clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Conclusions: Telepsychiatry is effective. More short- and long-term quantitative and qualitative research is warranted on clinical outcomes, predictors of satisfaction, costs, and educational outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12-23
Number of pages12
JournalCanadian Journal of Psychiatry
Volume49
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2004

Fingerprint

Videoconferencing
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis
Telemedicine
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Referral and Consultation
Communication
Technology
Research

Keywords

  • Cost
  • Education
  • Effectiveness
  • In-person
  • Mental health
  • Outcomes
  • Review
  • Satisfaction
  • Telephone
  • Telepsychiatry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Clinical and Educational Telepsychiatry Applications : A Review. / Hilty, Donald M.; Marks, Shayna L.; Urness, Doug; Yellowlees, Peter Mackinlay; Nesbitt, Thomas S.

In: Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 49, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 12-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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