Classes of conduct disorder symptoms and their life course correlates in a US national sample

J. Breslau, N. Saito, Daniel J Tancredi, M. Nock, S. E. Gilman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Population data on conduct disorder (CD) symptoms can help determine whether hypothesized subtypes of CD are sufficiently disparate in their familial, psychiatric and life course correlates to distinguish separate diagnostic entities.Method Latent class analysis (LCA) of CD symptoms occurring before age 15 was conducted in a national sample of adults aged 18-44 years from the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions. Associations of latent class membership with parental behavior problems, onset of psychiatric disorders and anti-social behaviors after age 15, adolescent life events (e.g. high school drop-out), and past-year life events (e.g. divorce/separation, bankruptcy) were estimated.Results LCA identified a no-CD class with low prevalence of all symptoms, three intermediate classes - deceit/theft, rule violations, aggression - and a severe class. The prevalence of CD, according to DSM-IV criteria, was 0% in the no-CD class, between 13.33% and 33.69% in the intermediate classes and 62.20% in the severe class. Latent class membership is associated with all the familial, psychiatric and life course outcomes examined. Among the intermediate classes, risk for subsequent mood/anxiety disorders and anti-social behavior was higher in the deceit/theft and aggressive classes than in the rule violations class. However, risk for adolescent life events is highest in the rule violations class.Conclusions CD symptoms tend to occur in a partially ordered set of classes in the general population. Prognostically meaningful distinctions can be drawn between classes, but only at low levels of symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1081-1089
Number of pages9
JournalPsychological Medicine
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

Fingerprint

Conduct Disorder
Theft
Psychiatry
Social Behavior Disorders
Bankruptcy
Divorce
Social Behavior
Anxiety Disorders
Aggression
Mood Disorders
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Population
Epidemiologic Studies
Alcohols

Keywords

  • Conduct disorder
  • epidemiology
  • latent class analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Classes of conduct disorder symptoms and their life course correlates in a US national sample. / Breslau, J.; Saito, N.; Tancredi, Daniel J; Nock, M.; Gilman, S. E.

In: Psychological Medicine, Vol. 42, No. 5, 05.2012, p. 1081-1089.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Breslau, J. ; Saito, N. ; Tancredi, Daniel J ; Nock, M. ; Gilman, S. E. / Classes of conduct disorder symptoms and their life course correlates in a US national sample. In: Psychological Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 42, No. 5. pp. 1081-1089.
@article{be407768c38e4eaea466cf48134d845a,
title = "Classes of conduct disorder symptoms and their life course correlates in a US national sample",
abstract = "Background Population data on conduct disorder (CD) symptoms can help determine whether hypothesized subtypes of CD are sufficiently disparate in their familial, psychiatric and life course correlates to distinguish separate diagnostic entities.Method Latent class analysis (LCA) of CD symptoms occurring before age 15 was conducted in a national sample of adults aged 18-44 years from the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions. Associations of latent class membership with parental behavior problems, onset of psychiatric disorders and anti-social behaviors after age 15, adolescent life events (e.g. high school drop-out), and past-year life events (e.g. divorce/separation, bankruptcy) were estimated.Results LCA identified a no-CD class with low prevalence of all symptoms, three intermediate classes - deceit/theft, rule violations, aggression - and a severe class. The prevalence of CD, according to DSM-IV criteria, was 0{\%} in the no-CD class, between 13.33{\%} and 33.69{\%} in the intermediate classes and 62.20{\%} in the severe class. Latent class membership is associated with all the familial, psychiatric and life course outcomes examined. Among the intermediate classes, risk for subsequent mood/anxiety disorders and anti-social behavior was higher in the deceit/theft and aggressive classes than in the rule violations class. However, risk for adolescent life events is highest in the rule violations class.Conclusions CD symptoms tend to occur in a partially ordered set of classes in the general population. Prognostically meaningful distinctions can be drawn between classes, but only at low levels of symptoms.",
keywords = "Conduct disorder, epidemiology, latent class analysis",
author = "J. Breslau and N. Saito and Tancredi, {Daniel J} and M. Nock and Gilman, {S. E.}",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1017/S003329171100198X",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "1081--1089",
journal = "Psychological Medicine",
issn = "0033-2917",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Classes of conduct disorder symptoms and their life course correlates in a US national sample

AU - Breslau, J.

AU - Saito, N.

AU - Tancredi, Daniel J

AU - Nock, M.

AU - Gilman, S. E.

PY - 2012/5

Y1 - 2012/5

N2 - Background Population data on conduct disorder (CD) symptoms can help determine whether hypothesized subtypes of CD are sufficiently disparate in their familial, psychiatric and life course correlates to distinguish separate diagnostic entities.Method Latent class analysis (LCA) of CD symptoms occurring before age 15 was conducted in a national sample of adults aged 18-44 years from the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions. Associations of latent class membership with parental behavior problems, onset of psychiatric disorders and anti-social behaviors after age 15, adolescent life events (e.g. high school drop-out), and past-year life events (e.g. divorce/separation, bankruptcy) were estimated.Results LCA identified a no-CD class with low prevalence of all symptoms, three intermediate classes - deceit/theft, rule violations, aggression - and a severe class. The prevalence of CD, according to DSM-IV criteria, was 0% in the no-CD class, between 13.33% and 33.69% in the intermediate classes and 62.20% in the severe class. Latent class membership is associated with all the familial, psychiatric and life course outcomes examined. Among the intermediate classes, risk for subsequent mood/anxiety disorders and anti-social behavior was higher in the deceit/theft and aggressive classes than in the rule violations class. However, risk for adolescent life events is highest in the rule violations class.Conclusions CD symptoms tend to occur in a partially ordered set of classes in the general population. Prognostically meaningful distinctions can be drawn between classes, but only at low levels of symptoms.

AB - Background Population data on conduct disorder (CD) symptoms can help determine whether hypothesized subtypes of CD are sufficiently disparate in their familial, psychiatric and life course correlates to distinguish separate diagnostic entities.Method Latent class analysis (LCA) of CD symptoms occurring before age 15 was conducted in a national sample of adults aged 18-44 years from the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions. Associations of latent class membership with parental behavior problems, onset of psychiatric disorders and anti-social behaviors after age 15, adolescent life events (e.g. high school drop-out), and past-year life events (e.g. divorce/separation, bankruptcy) were estimated.Results LCA identified a no-CD class with low prevalence of all symptoms, three intermediate classes - deceit/theft, rule violations, aggression - and a severe class. The prevalence of CD, according to DSM-IV criteria, was 0% in the no-CD class, between 13.33% and 33.69% in the intermediate classes and 62.20% in the severe class. Latent class membership is associated with all the familial, psychiatric and life course outcomes examined. Among the intermediate classes, risk for subsequent mood/anxiety disorders and anti-social behavior was higher in the deceit/theft and aggressive classes than in the rule violations class. However, risk for adolescent life events is highest in the rule violations class.Conclusions CD symptoms tend to occur in a partially ordered set of classes in the general population. Prognostically meaningful distinctions can be drawn between classes, but only at low levels of symptoms.

KW - Conduct disorder

KW - epidemiology

KW - latent class analysis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84859219470&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84859219470&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S003329171100198X

DO - 10.1017/S003329171100198X

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 1081

EP - 1089

JO - Psychological Medicine

JF - Psychological Medicine

SN - 0033-2917

IS - 5

ER -