Chronic oral infections of cats and their relationship to persistent oral carriage of feline calici-, immunodeficiency, or leukemia viruses

Aurea Pascal Tenorio, Charles E. Franti, Bruce R. Madewell, Niels C Pedersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two hundred and twenty-six cats from the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH), a cat shelter, and a purebred cattery were tested for chronic feline calicivirus (FCV), feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infections. Chronic oral carriage of FCV was present in about one-fifth of the cats in each of the groups. FIV infection was not present in the purebred cattery, was moderately prevalent (8%) in the pet population of cats examined at the VMTH for various complaints and was rampant in the cat shelter (21%). Unexpectedly high FeLV infection rates were found in the hospital cat population (28%) and in the purebred cattery (36%), but not in the cat shelter (1.4%). FCV and FeLV infections tended to occur early in life, whereas FIV infections tended to occur in older animals. From 43 to 100% of the cats in these environments had oral cavity disease ranging from mild gingivitis (23-46%), proliferative gingivitis (18-20%), periodontitis (3-32%) and periodontitis with involvement of extra-gingival tissues (7-27%). Cats infected solely with FCV did not have a greater likelihood of oral lesions, or more severe oral disease, than cats that were totally virus free. This was also true for cats infected solely with FeLV, or for cats dually infected with FeLV and FCV. Cats infected solely with FIV appeared to have a greater prevalence of oral cavity infections and their oral cavity disease tended to be more severe than cats without FIV infection. FIV-infected cats that were coinfected with either FCV, or with FCV and FeLV, had the highest prevalence of oral cavity infections and the most severe oral lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalVeterinary Immunology and Immunopathology
Volume29
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Immunology
  • veterinary(all)

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